Rosie’s Recipe — Victory Pie Crust

One of my earliest childhood memories is of standing on a stool, in front of the kitchen counter, watching my mother make pie crust. She could sculpt the crust on the rim of the pie plate like Picasso, and, in my child eyes, I must have perceived this as the grown-up equivalent version of playing with Play-dough. She’d always break off little pieces and let me taste it. The raw dough was delicious. (It still is.)

Sadly, for whatever reason, my mother soon stopped baking pies from scratch. I never knew exactly why. She always said her mother could whip up a pie crust with virtually no effort at all, so perhaps my mother felt that she simply couldn’t compete with Grandma’s pies. Or maybe she simply didn’t like making pie crust. Whatever the reason, her homemade pies virtually disappeared from the family menu, and, on those rare occasions when she did bake a pie, she used the frozen pie shells from the grocer’s freezer.

Since I had no one to teach me how to make a pie crust from scratch I never learned how. I just assumed that it was too difficult, causing me to develop an affection I’ll call, Pie Crust Phobia. After I became an adult and left home I too bought the frozen pie shells. They’re not bad, but they just don’t have the flavor, or the flakiness, of a pie crust made from scratch.

Fast forward a few years. I’m testing recipes for, Rosie’s Riveting Recipes, and the time had come to conquer my Pie Crust Phobia by going for broke and making my own pie crust from scratch.

They say that certain genes skip a generation as I discovered that making pie crust from scratch isn’t rocket science after all. All you need is some flour, baking powder, shortening, and a little water. Having the right tools helps too. I bought a pastry cutter at Walmart, and that investment of a few dollars really paid off because it makes blending in the shortening a snap.

Victory Pie Crust is used in many of the historic recipes in Rosie’s Riveting Recipes. And one other historic note. The word, “victory,” was a significant par of the lexicon during World War Two. It was a moral booster that was used everywhere.

GM

VICTORY PIE CRUST

  • 1¼ cups sifted flour
  • ½ teaspoon baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 3 or 4 tablespoons cold shortening
  • 3 or 3½ tablespoons ice water*

Sift flour once, measure, add baking powder and salt, and sift again. Cut shortening into small pieces; add to flour and cut in until mixture is almost as fine as meal. Make small well in flour mixture. Turn 1 tablespoon ice water in this and mix quickly and lightly with surrounding flour only until a small ball of dough is formed. Do not over mix. Repeat this way, mixing all of the flour in separate portions. Then press portions together lightly but firmly into one dough. Makes enough pastry for 9-inch pie shell. Double recipe for pastry for two-crust pie.

*Use only 3 tablespoons ice water with 4 tablespoons shortening; use 3½ tablespoons ice water with 3 tablespoons shortening.

Note: If the crust should come out too dry and crumbly simply add small amounts of water until the mixture has a more doughy consistency.

Rosie’s Recipe–Fruit Honey Cobblers

My mother used to make yummy fruit cobblers, and she served them for breakfast as well as dessert. Then somehow or other I misplaced her recipe, but, luckily, while I was testing recipes Rosie’s Riveting Recipes, I came across this gem. Originally published in my first historic cookbook, Anna’s Kitchen, it’s easy to prepare, and works with either canned or fresh peaches. It also leaves your kitchen smelling absolutely divine.

Enjoy.

GM

FRUIT HONEY COBBLERS

¼ cup honey
½ teaspoon cinnamon
2 teaspoons butter, melted
1 No. 2½ can peaches, drained, or 6 fresh peaches, pared and sliced

Combine honey, cinnamon, and butter. Add peaches. Place individual baking dishes or custard cups. Use the following crust for topping:

1 cup sifted all purpose flour
1½ teaspoons baking powder, (or ¾ teaspoon double-acting)*
¼ teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons sugar
2 tablespoons shortening
2/3 cup milk

Sift flour once, measure, add baking powder, salt, and sugar; sift together twice. Cut in shortening until it resembles coarse meal. Add milk; stir until all flour is dampened. Drop dough on prepared fruit; spread evenly to edge. Bake in hot oven (425º F) for about 20 minutes, or until crust is nicely browned. Serve warm, with cream or hard sauce.

Note: Pitted cherries, apricot halves, or plums may be substituted for peaches.

Modern adaptation: A number 2½ can equals approximately 3½ cups. If using canned peaches two 15-ounce cans would be suitable for this recipe. Leftover peaches, if any, can be saved and used as a garnish. If custard cups are not available this recipe can also be prepared in an 8 x 8 inch baking dish.

*Most modern baking powders are double-acting.

Pumpkin Walnut Cheesecake Pie

It’s that time of yeapumpkin-cheesecake-pier, what I like to think of as, “Pumpkin Spice,” season. Ha!

This recipe may not exactly be low carb, but it’s yummy, and it’s seasonal. You may even want to consider serving it as part of your Thanksgiving meal.

Enjoy,

GM

 

PUMPKIN WALNUT CHEESECAKE PIE

  • 2 packages (8 oz) cream cheese
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 1 (15 oz) can of pumpkin
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 frozen pie shells, thawed
  • 1 1/4 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon ginger
  • 1 teaspoon nutmeg
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt

Topping

  • 6 tablespoons butter, softened
  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • 1 cup chopped walnuts

Preheat oven to 350° F. Cream sugar and cheese together in a large mixing bowl. Add pumpkin and spices and mix thoroughly. Beat in eggs, one at a time. Add salt and blend until creamy. Pour equal amounts into pie shells and bake for 30 minutes.

While cheesecake is baking prepare topping. Cream butter and brown sugar in a small mixing bowl. Add walnuts and blend thoroughly. Remove cheesecakes from oven after 30 minutes and sprinkle on topping. Return to oven and bake for approximately 50 minutes to 1 hour, or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean. Let cool. Serve with whipped cream topping, if desired.

Sugar Free Banana Muffins

Sugar was rationed during Rosie’s day, however this recipe came to me from a friend whose kids have food allergies, and it was something they could eat. The muffins are tasty, and the recipe uses all natural ingredients. Best of all, it’s easy to prepare, and something you may want to try if you want to avoid sugar or corn syrup.

Enjoy.

GM

026SUGAR FREE BANANA MUFFINS

5 – 6 ripe bananas, mashed
1/4 cup olive oil
1/4 cup honey
1 tsp vanilla
2 1/4 cup whole-wheat flour
3/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1 1/4 teaspoon baking soda

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Lightly oil muffin pan, or use baking cups. Stir together bananas, oil, honey and vanilla in a medium sized bowl. Combine flour, nutmeg and baking soda in a large bowl. Stir in the wet ingredients and blend with a spoon. Drop mixture into muffin cups, filling to the rim. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes or until golden brown. If desired, chopped nuts may be added.