Rosie’s Recipe — Lemon Chiffon Pie

People may have had to cope with food shortages in Rosie’s day, but that didn’t mean they weren’t enjoying delicious desserts that are still tasty today. In fact, this pie turned out so good I would call it decadent, yet it’s also surprisingly easy to prepare. For best results I recommend using your favorite pie crust recipe, or trying the historic Victory Pie Crust referred to in this recipe. Frozen pie crust would also be suitable. Whichever crust you use, be sure to bake it as directed below before adding the lemon filling.

Enjoy,

GM

LEMON CHIFFON PIE

  • 3 egg yolks, slightly beaten
  • 1 cup water
  • ½ cup sugar
  • 1 package Lemon Jell-O
  • 3 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 1½ teaspoons grated lemon rind
  • dash of salt
  • 3 egg whites
  • baked pie shell

Combine egg yolks and water in top of double boiler, mixing well. Add 1/4 cup sugar and cook over hot water about 3 minutes, or until well heated, stirring constantly. Remove from fire. Add Jell-O and stir until dissolved. Add lemon juice and rind. Chill until slightly thickened. Add salt to egg whites and beat until foamy; then add remaining sugar gradually and continue beating until stiff. Fold slightly thickened Jell-O into egg whites. Pour into cold pie shell. Chill until firm.

BAKED PIE SHELL

Prepare Victory Pie Crust as directed above. Place dough on lightly floured board, shape round and pat flat with rolling pin. Then roll into 1½ -inch circle. Fold in half and place on bottom of inverted 9-inch pie plate. Open out folded half of pastry and fit snugly to plate. Trim off pastry to outer edge of plate and mark around rim with table fork dipped in flour. Prick crust well. Bake in hot oven (450º F) 15 to 18 minutes, or until lightly browned.

Rosie’s Recipe — Victory Pie Crust

One of my earliest childhood memories is of standing on a stool, in front of the kitchen counter, watching my mother make pie crust. She could sculpt the crust on the rim of the pie plate like Picasso, and, in my child eyes, I must have perceived this as the grown-up equivalent version of playing with Play-dough. She’d always break off little pieces and let me taste it. The raw dough was delicious. (It still is.)

Sadly, for whatever reason, my mother soon stopped baking pies from scratch. I never knew exactly why. She always said her mother could whip up a pie crust with virtually no effort at all, so perhaps my mother felt that she simply couldn’t compete with Grandma’s pies. Or maybe she simply didn’t like making pie crust. Whatever the reason, her homemade pies virtually disappeared from the family menu, and, on those rare occasions when she did bake a pie, she used the frozen pie shells from the grocer’s freezer.

Since I had no one to teach me how to make a pie crust from scratch I never learned how. I just assumed that it was too difficult, causing me to develop an affection I’ll call, Pie Crust Phobia. After I became an adult and left home I too bought the frozen pie shells. They’re not bad, but they just don’t have the flavor, or the flakiness, of a pie crust made from scratch.

Fast forward a few years. I’m testing recipes for, Rosie’s Riveting Recipes, and the time had come to conquer my Pie Crust Phobia by going for broke and making my own pie crust from scratch.

They say that certain genes skip a generation as I discovered that making pie crust from scratch isn’t rocket science after all. All you need is some flour, baking powder, shortening, and a little water. Having the right tools helps too. I bought a pastry cutter at Walmart, and that investment of a few dollars really paid off because it makes blending in the shortening a snap.

Victory Pie Crust is used in many of the historic recipes in Rosie’s Riveting Recipes. And one other historic note. The word, “victory,” was a significant par of the lexicon during World War Two. It was a moral booster that was used everywhere.

GM

VICTORY PIE CRUST

  • 1¼ cups sifted flour
  • ½ teaspoon baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 3 or 4 tablespoons cold shortening
  • 3 or 3½ tablespoons ice water*

Sift flour once, measure, add baking powder and salt, and sift again. Cut shortening into small pieces; add to flour and cut in until mixture is almost as fine as meal. Make small well in flour mixture. Turn 1 tablespoon ice water in this and mix quickly and lightly with surrounding flour only until a small ball of dough is formed. Do not over mix. Repeat this way, mixing all of the flour in separate portions. Then press portions together lightly but firmly into one dough. Makes enough pastry for 9-inch pie shell. Double recipe for pastry for two-crust pie.

*Use only 3 tablespoons ice water with 4 tablespoons shortening; use 3½ tablespoons ice water with 3 tablespoons shortening.

Note: If the crust should come out too dry and crumbly simply add small amounts of water until the mixture has a more doughy consistency.