Pot Roast – Good Old-Fashioned Comfort Food

Pot roast was a family favorite when I was growing up, and I think just about every kid’s mom made pot roast. It’s simply one of those good old-fashioned American comfort foods. It requires very little prep time, and just about anyone, regardless of their cooking skill, can whip up a pot roast. Modern cooks have a few more options, such as using a crock pot instead of a roasting pan, and there are a few other variations you can use as well.

My mother never wrote down her pot roast recipe. Some dishes are so basic they really don’t require one. This is how I make a pot roast. No doubt it’s similar to the way the rest of you make your pot roast too.

I start by putting my roast in the roasting pan, and then adding chopped onions, carrots, and potatoes. (Red potatoes work very well). Then, depending on your preferences, you can add celery, shallots, corn, squash, or lima beans, whatever vegetable you like. One time I even tried adding broccoli. It tasted okay, but broccoli doesn’t always smell so nice when it’s cooking, and it left a strong odor in my kitchen. Season the mixture with season salt and pepper. You can also use celery salt, garlic powder, onion powder and parsley, whatever your favorite seasonings happen to be.

I prefer having my pot roast well done, so if I’m baking it in the oven I set the thermostat to 350 and roast it for about 15 minutes per pound.  However, I usually make my pot roast in the crock pot, so I’ll start it in the morning and cook it on low all day. Whichever method you choose, be sure to add about a half cup of water to your mixture before you begin roasting.  That way the roast will stay moist and not get too dry.

Here’s another tip: the leftover roast can be used to make tacos. Place it in an iron skillet, add a little water and some taco seasoning blend, and break up the meat with a spoon as it’s heating.

Enjoy.

GM