B 1 Biscuits

from the Rosie’s Riveting Recipes historic cookbook

I grew up eating homemade biscuits. Biscuits and gravy was a Sunday morning breakfast staple when I was a kid. I’d wander into the kitchen, and there was Mom, or Dad, throwing some flour and shortening into a bowl, and rolling out the biscuit dough. Sometimes they’d let me cut out the biscuits with a water glass. The whole family loved fresh, homemade biscuits, and I still love biscuits today. Either smothered in gravy, or with hot, melted butter.

This historic biscuit recipe, however, is a little different than the biscuits my family baked.  These biscuits are unique and quite tasty. I would call them a cross between a biscuit and a muffin. The dough has the consistency of muffin dough, but it isn’t sweet like a muffin. I also like the subtle peanut butter flavor. It’s a nice complement to bacon and eggs, and tastes great with butter and honey.

Gayle Martin

 

B1 BISCUITS

  • 1 1/2 cups enriched all purpose flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 2 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 cups oats
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 2 tablespoons margarine*
  • 3 tablespoons peanut butter
  • 1 cup milk

Sift and measure flour. Resift with salt and baking powder. Stir in oats and sugar. Cut in margarine and peanut butter and add milk. Mix very lightly. Fill well-greased muffin pans 1/2 full. Brush tops with milk. Bake at 450• F for 20-25 minutes. Yield: 12 biscuits.

  • butter or shortening may be used instead of margarine
About the Rosie’s Riveting Recipes Cookbook
Cover photo by Robert Resetar.

Imagine the government telling you how much meat or chicken you could buy, or how much sugar or flour you could have. Strange as it may seem, at one time it actually happened. During WWII, the United States government devised a food rationing program to help insure that every family would have enough to eat. Rosie’s Riveting Recipes gives a glimpse into life on the WWII home front. A cookbook and a history lesson in one with more than 180 economical, back-to-basics World War 2 ration recipes with short tales of life on the American home front interspersed throughout.

 

 

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Refrigerator Bread Pudding

Book Cover for Rosies Riveting Recipes
Cover photo by Rob Resetar

This classic dessert from the pages of the Rosie’s Riveting Recipes historic cookbook is one that many of your grandmothers may have made. I tried it, and it’s delicious. What I really like about many of these historic dessert recipes is that they’re sweet, but not sugar-laden.

Gayle Martin

REFRIGERATOR BREAD PUDDING

  • 1 envelope plain gelatin
  • 2 cups milk
  • 1/2 cup light or dark corn syrup or 1/3 cup sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 4 slices white bread (2 1/2 cups cubed)
  • 2 eggs, slightly beaten
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • nutmeg, if desired

Soften gelatin in 1/4 cup cold milk. Scald remaining milk with corn syrup (or sugar) and salt in double boiler. Add gelatin and stir until dissolved. Remove crusts and cut slices of bread into cubes. Pour hot milk slowly over beaten eggs, stirring constantly. Return to double boiler. Add bread cubes and cook until custard consistency, stirring constantly. Remove from heat. Add vanilla and beat with rotary beater until frothy. Turn into one large (or individual molds) that have been rinsed in cold water first. Chill. When firm, un-mold and serve with cream or any sauce. Sprinkle with nutmeg.

Modern adaptation: Be careful not boil the milk. The beaten eggs can be slowly added to the milk mixture in the double boiler, stirring constantly as directed in the original recipe, until they are well blended. To give the pudding a bolder flavor add 1/4 teaspoon ginger, 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon, and 1/4 nutmeg with the vanilla. The pudding can also be poured into ramekins and served with whipped cream, cinnamon, or nutmeg on top, as suggested in the original historic recipe.

Rosie’s Riveting Recipes is available on Amazon and Barnes&noble.com.

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Our Mother’s Recipes — Yellow Cornbread

© Can Stock Photo / zigzagmtart

There’s nothing quite like the taste of fresh baked cornbread made from scratch. This recipe came from a friend’s mother’s recipe box, and no doubt lots of other mothers and grandmothers used the same, or a similar recipe. It’s the perfect side for homemade soups, such as Split Pea Soup, for the Rosie’s Riveting Recipes historic cookbook, and my own Chili con Carne recipe.

Gayle Martin

YELLOW CORNBREAD

  • 1 cup yellow cornmeal
  • 1 cup sifted flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/3 cup soft shortening
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1 egg

Sift dry ingredients together into a mixing bowl. Cut in shortening until well blended. Beat milk and egg together in a small mixing bowl and mix with dry ingredients until just blended. Pour into a well-greased 8 x 8 inch baking pan. Bake in a hot (400• F) oven for 25 minutes or until done.

For a sweeter cornbread sift 1/4 cup sugar with the dry ingredients, and cut shortening to 1/4 cup. This batter is also good for baking corn muffins or corn sticks.

For more information about the Rosie’s Riveting Recipes historic cookbook please click here for a free preview.

Cover photo by Robert Resetar.
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