SOUTHERN CHICKEN PIE

Book Cover for Rosies Riveting Recipes
Cover photo by Rob Resetar

The other day I was looking for a chicken and dumplings recipe, and this gem, from the Rosies Riveting Recipes historic cookbook, can be easily adapted for making chicken and dumplings. It’s also an easy way to use up leftover rotisserie chicken, or holiday turkey. Best of all, it’s delicious.

SOUTHERN CHICKEN PIE

  • 11/2 cups chopped celery
  • 1/2 cup chopped green pepper
  • 1/2 cup sliced mushrooms (optional)
  • 6 tablespoons butter
  • 8 tablespoons enriched flour
  • 4 cups milk (or half chicken broth and half milk)
  • 3 cups cooked, sliced chicken

Pan-fry celery, green pepper, and mushrooms in butter until tender. Remove from butter; add flour; mix well. Add milk gradually, stirring constantly, until thickened. Add celery mixture and chicken; blend well. Season to taste. Turn into 21/2 quart casserole or baking dish. Top with the following:

Baking Powder Biscuit Crust

  • 2 cups sifted flour
  • 3 teaspoons baking powder (or 2 teaspoons double-acting)*
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 cup shortening
  • 3/4 milk

Sift flour once, measure; add baking powder and salt; sift together. Cut in shortening until mixture resembles coarse meal. Add milk all at once, mixing until all flour is dampened. Turn out on floured board; knead lightly for a few seconds to smooth out dough. Roll out to fit over casserole. Place over chicken mixture. Bake in hot oven (425 F) about 25 to 30 minutes until crust is done. Serve immediately. Serves 8 to 10.

Modern adaptation: Carrots can also be used. Dough can also be placed over chicken mixture dumpling style.

* Most modern baking powder is double-acting.

Rosie’s Riveting Recipes is available on Amazon and Barnesandnoble.com.

 

Whole Wheat Rolls

from Rosie’s Riveting Recipes
© Can Stock Photo / SeDmi

Who doesn’t love fresh, home-baked bread? Seriously. The smell of fresh bread baking is intoxicating, and when you take it out of the oven? Ooh la la! Put a little butter on it and take a bite while it’s melting. If that’s not heaven and earth then I don’t know what is.

Okay, I get it that some bread recipes are pretty cumbersome. However, this historic recipe, from Rosie’s Riveting Recipes, is actually quite easy.  The fresh baked rolls are delicious, and it would even be a fun project to do with the kids or grandkids.

Gayle Martin

WHOLE WHEAT ROLLS

  • 1 cake compressed yeast
  • 1 3/4 cups lukewarm milk
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1 tablespoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons molasses
  • 2  cups flour, sifted
  • 3 cups medium whole wheat flour
  • 4 tablespoons soft shortening

Crumble yeast into bowl. Add lukewarm milk, sugar, salt, and molasses. Work in sifted flour, whole wheat flour, and shortening. Knead until smooth. Place in greased bowl. Cover with damp cloth. Let rise until double (2 hours.) Punch down. Let rise until almost double (45 minutes.) Punch down. Let rest 15 minutes. Shape. Place in greased pan. Let rise. (30 to 40 minutes.) Bake 15 5o 20 minutes (depending on size) in hot oven (425F). Makes 2 dozen rolls.

Modern adaptation: Dark corn syrup may be used as a substitute for molasses.

 

Cover photo by Robert Resetar.

Rosie’s Riveting Recipes is available on Amazon and Barnesandnoble.com.

 

Pigs In Blankets

from the Rosie’s Riveting Recipes historic cookbook
© Can Stock Photo/ MSPhotographics

Some dishes are destined to become classics, and this is certainly one of them. I loved pigs in a blanket when I was a kid, and I still enjoy them as an adult. This historic recipe from Rosie’s Riveting Recipes is easy, timeless, and delicious. Try it with your favorite fixings, or top it with chili, cheese and chopped onions.

Gayle Martin

 

PIGS IN BLANKETS

8 – 10 wieners or frankfurters

Bisquick

Simmer wieners in hot water for 10 minutes. Make Bisquick biscuit dough from package. Roll thin-cut in squares. Wrap wieners or franks (having ends show). Seal side edge by pinching together. Bake 15 minutes in hot oven. (450F) Serves 8 to 10.

Modern Adaption

Use Pillsbury Crescent Rolls instead of Bisquick

Cover photo by Robert Resetar.

Rosie’s Riveting Recipes is available on Amazon and Barnesandnoble.com.

Historic B 1 Biscuits

from the Rosie’s Riveting Recipes historic cookbook

Biscuits and gravy was a Sunday morning breakfast staple when I was growing up. I’d wander into the kitchen, and there was Mom, or Dad, throwing flour and shortening into a bowl, and rolling out the biscuit dough. Sometimes they’d let me cut out the biscuits with a water glass. My whole family loved fresh, homemade biscuits, and I still love biscuits today. Either smothered in gravy, or with hot, melted butter.

This historic biscuit recipe, however, is a little different than the biscuits my family baked. While unique and very tasty.,I would call them a cross between a biscuit and a muffin. The dough has the consistency of muffin dough, but it isn’t sweet like a muffin. I also like the subtle peanut butter flavor. It’s a nice complement to bacon and eggs, and tastes great with butter and honey.

Gayle Martin

 

B1 BISCUITS

  • 1 1/2 cups enriched all purpose flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 2 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 cups oats
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 2 tablespoons margarine*
  • 3 tablespoons peanut butter
  • 1 cup milk

Sift and measure flour. Resift with salt and baking powder. Stir in oats and sugar. Cut in margarine and peanut butter and add milk. Mix very lightly. Fill well-greased muffin pans 1/2 full. Brush tops with milk. Bake at 450• F for 20-25 minutes. Yield: 12 biscuits.

  • butter or shortening may be used instead of margarine
Cover photo by Rob Resetar

Rosie’s Riveting Recipes is available on Amazon and Barnesandnoble.com.

 

 

 

Crown Roast of Back Ribs

from the Rosie’s Riveting Recipes historic cookbook
© Can Stock Photo/ JB325

The back rib. Some people may think it’s the ugly cousin of the short rib, but with a little creativity they can be delicious. This historic recipe seemed daunting at first, then a friend suggested attaching the ribs together with wooden toothpicks or skewers instead of sewing them together. It worked. It made the dish much easier to prepare, and the results were positively yummy.

Gayle Martin

 

CROWN ROAST OF BACK RIBS

  • 1 1/2 lbs. back ribs
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup chopped onion
  • 3 tablespoons butter
  • 3 cups soft bread crumbs
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon pepper
  • 1 teaspoon poultry seasonings

Rub back ribs with salt. Mix remaining ingredients to form dressing. Sew ends of ribs together to resemble a crown. Place stuffing inside of ribs and bake in 350F oven for 2-3 hours or until tender. Makes 4 servings.

Modern Adaptation

Ribs can be tacked together with wooden toothpicks or toothpicks or skewers. (Do not use plastic.) After cooking, allow the ribs to rest before removing the toothpicks. Three slices of bread, with crusts removed and cut into cubes, can be also be used to make the dressing. You may also add chopped celery, nuts, or mushrooms.

 

Cover photo by Robert Resetar.

Rosie’s Riveting Recipes is available on Amazon and Barnesandnoble.com.

 

 

Refrigerator Bread Pudding

© Can Stock Photo/ kozzi
from Rosie’s Riveting Recipes

 

This classic dessert from the pages of the Rosie’s Riveting Recipes historic cookbook is one many of your grandmothers may have made. I tried it, and it’s delicious. What I really like about many of these historic dessert recipes is that they’re sweet, but not sugar-laden.

Gayle Martin

REFRIGERATOR BREAD PUDDING

  • 1 envelope plain gelatin
  • 2 cups milk
  • 1/2 cup light or dark corn syrup or 1/3 cup sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 4 slices white bread (2 1/2 cups cubed)
  • 2 eggs, slightly beaten
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • nutmeg, if desired

Soften gelatin in 1/4 cup cold milk. Scald remaining milk with corn syrup (or sugar) and salt in double boiler. Add gelatin and stir until dissolved. Remove crusts and cut slices of bread into cubes. Pour hot milk slowly over beaten eggs, stirring constantly. Return to double boiler. Add bread cubes and cook until custard consistency, stirring constantly. Remove from heat. Add vanilla and beat with rotary beater until frothy. Turn into one large (or individual molds) that have been rinsed in cold water first. Chill. When firm, un-mold and serve with cream or any sauce. Sprinkle with nutmeg.

Modern adaptation: Be careful not boil the milk. The beaten eggs can be slowly added to the milk mixture in the double boiler, stirring constantly as directed in the original recipe, until they are well blended. To give the pudding a bolder flavor add 1/4 teaspoon ginger, 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon, and 1/4 nutmeg with the vanilla. The pudding can also be poured into ramekins and served with whipped cream, cinnamon, or nutmeg on top, as suggested in the original historic recipe.

Cover photo by Robert Resetar.

Rosie’s Riveting Recipes is available on Amazon and Barnes&noble.com.

Beef Chop Suey

adapted from the Rosie’s Riveting Recipes historic cookbook
© Can Stock Photo / Dusan

The following recipe is based on a historic Heart Chop Suey recipe included in Rosie’s Riveting Recipes. However, I used regular beef instead of beef heart. Many people may find organ meat less than palatable, and beef heart may be difficult to find. I used stew meat, but I think chuck steak, flank steak or other cheaper cuts of beef would also work nicely. The end result was a tasty, easy-to-prepare meal that was both healthy and delicious. Somehow, I think Rosie would approve.

Gayle Martin

BEEF CHOP SUEY

  • 1 to 1 1/2 pounds stew meat or chuck steak
  • 3 tablespoons flour
  • 2 cups coarsely chopped onion
  • 1 cup chopped carrots
  • 1/4 cup butter or margarine
  • 1 cup diced celery
  • 1/2 coarsely chopped green pepper
  • 2 bouillon cubes
  • 2 cups water (or 2 cups of beef broth, omitting bouillon cubes)
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 4 cups boiled rice

Cut meat into 1/2-inch cubes and dust with flour. Place meat and onion in heavy frying pan and brown in butter or margarine. Add celery, carrots, green pepper and bouillon cubes and 2 cups water. (Beef or chicken stock can be used in place of water and bouillon cubes.) Cover and simmer until tender, about 1 to 1/2 hours. Add seasonings and sauce. Serve with boiled rice or fried Chinese Noodles. Yields 6-8 servings.

Cover photo by Robert Resetar.

Rosie’s Riveting Recipes is available on Amazon and Barnesandnoble.com.

 

Ham and Sweet Potatoes

From the Rosie’s Riveting Recipes historic cookbook

I once had a friend who loved sweet potatoes. I mean seriously loved them. So much so that she would have done nothing short of grabbing a steak knife and telling you to back off if you got too close to her sweet potatoes. Now that’s a food devotion. However, she wasn’t much of a cook, and when I began testing recipes for Rosie’s Riveting Recipes, I passed this one along to her. It’s easy to prepare, even for those who are kitchen challenged. It’s also a nice dish for those who wax nostalgic for holiday meals over the course of the year.

Gayle Martin

HAM WITH SWEET POTATOES

  • 1 1/2 pounds sliced ham or shoulder
  • 3 cups raw, sliced sweet potatoes
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1 cup hot water
  • 1 tablespoon margarine

Cut the ham or shoulder into pieces for serving. If the meat is very salty, parboil it in water and drain. Brown the meat lightly on both sides and arrange the pieces to cover the bottom of a baking dish. Spread the sliced sweet potatoes over the meat, sprinkle with sugar. Add hot water to melted margarine and pour over the sweet potatoes and meat. Cover the dish and bake slowly until the meat and sweet potatoes are tender, basting the sweet potatoes occasionally with the gravy. Toward the last, remove the lid and let the top brown well. Yields 6 servings.

Modern adaptation: Heat oven to 350F. Butter may be used instead of margarine. Cover with aluminum foil and bake for approximately one hour, basting the sweet potatoes occasionally as directed in the original recipe. After baking for one hour remove foil and bake an additional 10 to 15 minutes or until the sweet potatoes have browned. Turkey ham may also be used, and the sugar can be decreased to one teaspoon.

Cover photo by Robert Resetar.

Rosie’s Riveting Recipes is available on Amazon and Barnesandnoble.com.

 

Old-Time Rice Custard Pudding

From the Rosie’s Riveting Recipes cookbook
© Can Stock Photo/pruden

My ex husband used to bring home rice pudding from the refrigerated section at the supermarket. He said it reminded him of his grandmother’s rice pudding. I’d never had rice pudding before, and it reminded me of my grandmother’s homemade tapioca pudding. Funny how certain foods bring back happy childhood memories.

Fast forward a few years. I’m testing some recipes for the Rosie’s Riveting Recipes historic cookbook. This rice pudding recipe was easy to prepare and used ingredients found in most pantries. However, it had a very different texture from the premade supermarket rice pudding, which created a delicious yet totally different experience. Puddings have variations, and it’s nice to try something different.

Gayle Martin

OLD-TIME RICE CUSTARD PUDDING

  • 2 cups cooked rice
  • 1/2 cup seedless raisins
  • 2 cups scalded milk*
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • nutmeg

Mix rice and raisins. Place in 8-inch baking pan, 3 inches deep. Blend milk into beaten eggs, sugar, salt and vanilla. Pour over rice and raisin mixture. Sprinkle with nutmeg. Place pan in shallow pan of water. Steam bake 1 1/2 hours in moderate oven (325F). Serve warm or chilled, with or without cream.

*Pasteurization has taken the place of scalding.

 

Cover photo by Rob Resetar

Rosie’s Riveting Recipes is available on Amazon and Barnesandnoble.com.

Eggless Chocolate Cake

© Can Stock Photo / NewIllustrations

Food was scarce back in Rosie’s day. Many common items on grocery shelves were hard to come by, even with rationing. Food companies had to come up with new recipes to make scarce ingredients go further, or even eliminate them completely. This delicious historic recipe, from Rosie’s Riveting Recipes cookbook, omits eggs.

By the way, a rotary beater was another term for an eggbeater, although most of us today use whisks.

Gayle Martin

EGGLESS CHOCOLATE CAKE

2 squares unsweetened chocolate
1 cup milk
1 3/4 cups sifted flour
3/4 teaspoon soda
3/4 teaspoon salt
1 cup sugar
1/3 cup shortening
1 teaspoon vanilla

Combine chocolate and milk in top of double boiler and cook over rapidly boiling water 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Blend with rotary egg beater; cool.

Sift flour once, measure, add soda, salt, and sugar, and sift together three times. Cream shortening, add flour, vanilla, and chocolate mixture. Stir until all flour is dampened. Then beat vigorously 1 minute. Bake in two greased and lightly floured 8-inch layer pans in moderate oven (375 F) 20 minutes, or until done. Spread frosting between layers and on top of cake.

Cocoa Cake: Substitute 1/3 cup cocoa for chocolate. Sift it with the dry ingredients; add cold milk with vanilla.

 

Cover photo by Robert Resetar.

Rosie’s Riveting Recipes is available on Amazon and Barnesandnoble.com.