Barbecued Ribs Crockpot Style

© Can Stock Photo/
robynmac

My college boyfriend, who I’ll call George, was studying to become an architect. However, had he pursued it, I truly believe he would have been a damn fine chef. George was a whiz in the kitchen. He was master at creating simple, tasty dishes on a slim budget. George could take a boring, frozen pizza, pile on his own freshly made toppings, and turn it into a gourmet meal.

One of George’s signature dishes was his short ribs. He’d dump them in a crock pot, pour in a bottle of barbecue sauce, and cook them on low for eight hours. They came out so tender the meat fell off the bone. Neither of us had access to an outdoor grill at the time, but George’s ribs sure satisfied our yen for barbecue.

Over the years I’ve tweaked his recipe, ever so slightly. These days, with food prices on the rise, short ribs are like gold. However, their ugly cousin, the back rib, is cheaper and flavorful. They also work nicely in a crock pot.

I simply stack the ribs in and add a little barbecue sauce between the layers. I’ll then add a little sauce on the top. The sauce becomes watery as it cooks, so I only use a quarter to half a bottle. Then I turn the pot on low and cook for seven to eight hours. I also check them while they’re cooking. If the meat on top gets a little dry I simply spoon some of the sauce from the bottom of the pot over it. Then, once the ribs are cooked, I’ll pour on a little more fresh sauce when I plate them.

I like to serve mine with scalloped potatoes or baked beans. Or both. Some people like corn on the cob and mashed potatoes. Or you may wish to try grandmother’s green bean recipe. Whichever way you choose, it’s a nice recipe for those who don’t have access to an outdoor grill.

Gayle Martin

Cover photo by Rob Resetar

If you like ribs and barbeque then be sure to check out the Rosie’s Riveting Recipes cookbook for delicious historic barbeque style recipes.

 

Chicken Scaloppine in Wine Sauce

© Can Stock Photo/
roxanabalint

My favorite supermarket carries fresh, thinly sliced chicken breasts which always seem to be on sale. I’ve come up with several different ways to prepare them, however, this recipe is my favorite. It was originally a veal recipe, but I played with it and came up with something new and delicious.

While this recipe is not included in the Rosie’s Riveting Recipes historic cookbook, I think Rosie would have approved. It’s easy to prepare, and most of the ingredients can be found in our pantries. It’s also delicious.

Gayle Martin

 

CHICKEN SCALOPPINE IN WHITE WINE SAUCE

  • 4 to 6 thinly sliced chicken breasts
  • 3 to 4 tablespoons flour
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 2 to 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 4 to 6 tablespoons white wine vinegar (approximately)
  • 1/4 cup white cooking wine
  • 1 cup chicken broth
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt (optional)
  • 3 cups cooked rice, wild rice, or noodles

Wash chicken breasts thoroughly. Pat dry with a paper towel. Melt butter in a skillet and add olive oil. While the oil is heating roll the chicken breasts in flour until lightly coated. Place in hot oil and cook each side until it’s a light, golden brown color. Pour approximately 1 tablespoon white wine vinegar over each chicken breast and add the chicken broth, white cooking wine and salt, if desired. Heat until sauce mixture begins to boil. Reduce heat to low, cover and simmer for 20 minutes. Serve over rice or noodles.

Variation:  Veal may be instead of chicken, and balsamic vinegar  may be used instead of white wine vinegar.

Book Cover for Rosies Riveting Recipes
Cover photo by Rob Resetar

Rosie’s Riveting Recipes is available on Amazon and Barnesandnoble.com.

Easy Creamy Turkey ala King

a tasty dish for Thanksgiving leftovers
© Can Stock Photo / ajafoto

Thanksgiving is over, so what to do with all the leftover turkey? This dish, while not included in the Rosie’s Riveting Recipes historic cookbook, is easy to prepare and delicious. You can also serve it year round using chicken instead of turkey.

Gayle Martin

Easy Creamy Turkey ala King

  • 1/4 cup butter or margarine
  • 2 to 4 tablespoons cornstarch (depending on desired thickness)
  • 2 cups chicken broth
  • 1 cup milk
  • 2 cups cooked turkey, cubed
  • 1 cup frozen peas and carrots, thawed
  • 1 can sliced mushrooms
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper

Melt butter at medium low heat in a large saucepan or small stockpot. Stir in cornstarch and blend until smooth. Add chicken broth, milk and seasonings. Increase heat to medium. Stir and bring the mixture to a boil, stirring constantly for 1 to 2 minutes or until the desired consistency is reached. Reduce heat to a simmer and stir in cubed turkey, peas and carrots and mushrooms. Simmer for several minutes, stirring periodically to prevent scorching, until the turkey is heated through. Serve on biscuits, toast, or leftover stuffing.

 

Note: Leftovers may thicken in the refrigerator. Add small amounts of chicken broth or milk, if needed, while reheating on medium heat. Leftovers can also be frozen. Leftover Thanksgiving vegetables may also be used instead of the peas and carrots.

Cover photo by Rob Resetar

Rosie’s Riveting Recipes is available on Amazon and Barnesandnoble.com.

Crown Roast of Back Ribs

from the Rosie’s Riveting Recipes historic cookbook
© Can Stock Photo/ JB325

The back rib. Some people may think it’s the ugly cousin of the short rib, but with a little creativity they can be delicious. This historic recipe seemed daunting at first, then a friend suggested attaching the ribs together with wooden toothpicks or skewers instead of sewing them together. It worked. It made the dish much easier to prepare, and the results were positively yummy.

Gayle Martin

 

CROWN ROAST OF BACK RIBS

  • 1 1/2 lbs. back ribs
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup chopped onion
  • 3 tablespoons butter
  • 3 cups soft bread crumbs
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon pepper
  • 1 teaspoon poultry seasonings

Rub back ribs with salt. Mix remaining ingredients to form dressing. Sew ends of ribs together to resemble a crown. Place stuffing inside of ribs and bake in 350F oven for 2-3 hours or until tender. Makes 4 servings.

Modern Adaptation

Ribs can be tacked together with wooden toothpicks or toothpicks or skewers. (Do not use plastic.) After cooking, allow the ribs to rest before removing the toothpicks. Three slices of bread, with crusts removed and cut into cubes, can be also be used to make the dressing. You may also add chopped celery, nuts, or mushrooms.

 

Cover photo by Robert Resetar.

Rosie’s Riveting Recipes is available on Amazon and Barnesandnoble.com.

 

 

My Homemade Chicken Divan

© Can Stock Photo/
roxanabalint

I’m not a big fan of frozen dinners, but when I was a teenager my mother used to buy Stouffer’s Chicken Divan. I loved it. It was divine. I’m not sure if they still make it or not, however, I’ve tweaked a couple of Campbell’s Soup recipes together to come up with my own version, and I think I’ve come pretty close. It’s easy to prepare, and tasty. Best of all, it uses ingredients most of us probably already have. Enjoy.

Gayle Martin

CHICKEN DIVAN

(inspired by Campbell’s Soup recipes)

  • 2 or 3 boneless chicken breasts
  • 1 can cream of mushroom soup
  • 1/4 cup milk
  • 2 tablespoons butter (melted)
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 cup fresh or frozen broccoli (thawed)
  • 2 cups cooked noodles
  • 1/2 cup grated cheddar cheese or cheddar cheese blend
  • 1 small can fresh mushrooms (optional)
  • 2 to 3 tablespoons bread crumbs

Chop broccoli, (if using fresh), and prepare noodles according to package directions. Clean chicken breasts thoroughly and cut into small cubes. Saute in a skillet until they are cooked all the way through. Remove from heat.

In a 2-quart casserole dish stir milk, melted butter, and cream of mushroom soup. Add pepper and canned mushrooms, if desired. Add broccoli, cooked noodles and cooked chicken, mix well. Top with generous layer of grated cheddar cheese and breadcrumbs. Bake in 350F oven for 25 to 30 minutes, or until top layer is brown and sauce is bubbling.

Book Cover for Rosies Riveting Recipes
Cover photo by Rob Resetar

The Rosie’s Riveting Recipes historic cookbook contains many delicious historic chicken recipes that you may also wish to try. Please click here for a free preview.

 

Beef Chop Suey

adapted from the Rosie’s Riveting Recipes historic cookbook
© Can Stock Photo / Dusan

The following recipe is based on a historic Heart Chop Suey recipe included in Rosie’s Riveting Recipes. However, I used regular beef instead of beef heart. Many people may find organ meat less than palatable, and beef heart may be difficult to find. I used stew meat, but I think chuck steak, flank steak or other cheaper cuts of beef would also work nicely. The end result was a tasty, easy-to-prepare meal that was both healthy and delicious. Somehow, I think Rosie would approve.

Gayle Martin

BEEF CHOP SUEY

  • 1 to 1 1/2 pounds stew meat or chuck steak
  • 3 tablespoons flour
  • 2 cups coarsely chopped onion
  • 1 cup chopped carrots
  • 1/4 cup butter or margarine
  • 1 cup diced celery
  • 1/2 coarsely chopped green pepper
  • 2 bouillon cubes
  • 2 cups water (or 2 cups of beef broth, omitting bouillon cubes)
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 4 cups boiled rice

Cut meat into 1/2-inch cubes and dust with flour. Place meat and onion in heavy frying pan and brown in butter or margarine. Add celery, carrots, green pepper and bouillon cubes and 2 cups water. (Beef or chicken stock can be used in place of water and bouillon cubes.) Cover and simmer until tender, about 1 to 1/2 hours. Add seasonings and sauce. Serve with boiled rice or fried Chinese Noodles. Yields 6-8 servings.

Cover photo by Robert Resetar.

Rosie’s Riveting Recipes is available on Amazon and Barnesandnoble.com.

 

Ham and Sweet Potatoes

From the Rosie’s Riveting Recipes historic cookbook

I once had a friend who loved sweet potatoes. I mean seriously loved them. So much so that she would have done nothing short of grabbing a steak knife and telling you to back off if you got too close to her sweet potatoes. Now that’s a food devotion. However, she wasn’t much of a cook, and when I began testing recipes for Rosie’s Riveting Recipes, I passed this one along to her. It’s easy to prepare, even for those who are kitchen challenged. It’s also a nice dish for those who wax nostalgic for holiday meals over the course of the year.

Gayle Martin

HAM WITH SWEET POTATOES

  • 1 1/2 pounds sliced ham or shoulder
  • 3 cups raw, sliced sweet potatoes
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1 cup hot water
  • 1 tablespoon margarine

Cut the ham or shoulder into pieces for serving. If the meat is very salty, parboil it in water and drain. Brown the meat lightly on both sides and arrange the pieces to cover the bottom of a baking dish. Spread the sliced sweet potatoes over the meat, sprinkle with sugar. Add hot water to melted margarine and pour over the sweet potatoes and meat. Cover the dish and bake slowly until the meat and sweet potatoes are tender, basting the sweet potatoes occasionally with the gravy. Toward the last, remove the lid and let the top brown well. Yields 6 servings.

Modern adaptation: Heat oven to 350F. Butter may be used instead of margarine. Cover with aluminum foil and bake for approximately one hour, basting the sweet potatoes occasionally as directed in the original recipe. After baking for one hour remove foil and bake an additional 10 to 15 minutes or until the sweet potatoes have browned. Turkey ham may also be used, and the sugar can be decreased to one teaspoon.

Cover photo by Robert Resetar.

Rosie’s Riveting Recipes is available on Amazon and Barnesandnoble.com.

 

Alex’s Macaroni and Cheese

© Can Stock Photo / MSPhotographics

When I’m not in the kitchen I write romance novels under the pen name Marina Martindale. So far, each novel has included a scene where my characters enjoy a home cooked meal, and I include the recipe in the back of the book.

In my second novel, The Deception, Alex is reunited with Carrie, his long-lost childhood friend. When he comes to her apartment to prepare dinner for her, he makes his mother’s macaroni and cheese; their favorite childhood dish.

They say art imitates life, and macaroni and cheese is one of my favorite childhood dishes too. Problem was, I had no family recipe, and, ding, ding, ding, I’d been buying the prepackaged mac and cheese dinners for years. I confess. It was a bad habit I picked up back when I was a starving college student, so the time had come to break it. I compiled several different recipes, did some test runs and tweaks, and soon came up with a mac and cheese recipe that was absolutely delicious. No wonder Alex and Carrie loved it. You will too.

Gayle Martin

ALEX’S MACARONI & CHEESE

  • 2 cups macaroni, cooked and drained
  • 2 1/2  cups milk
  • 1 cup sour cream
  • 2 1/2 cups grated Mexican cheese blend
  • (or 2 1/2 cups cheddar)
  • 1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese
  • 4 tablespoons butter, divided
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon dry mustard
  • 1/4 teaspoon paprika
  • 1/3 cup breadcrumbs

Preheat oven to 350F and cook pasta in boiling water for 8 to 10 minutes. Drain. While pasta is cooking whisk milk and sour cream together in a medium-sized mixing bowl and add seasonings. Set aside. Chop two tablespoons of butter into small pieces. Chill in refrigerator until needed. Melt remaining 2 tablespoons of butter in a small mixing bowl. Add breadcrumbs, blend thoroughly and set aside.

Layer half of the cooked and drained macaroni, butter and cheese into an 8 x 8 inch baking dish. Top with the remaining macaroni, butter and cheese. Pour in the milk mixture and sprinkle the breadcrumbs on top. Bake for approximately 30 to 40 minutes, or until the top is crispy and brown.

If desired, ham or sausage may be added. Low-fat milk, sour cream and cheeses may also be used. Penne pasta may also be used instead of elbow macaroni.

 

Cover photo by Robert Resetar.

Rosie’s Riveting Recipes is available on Amazon and Barnesandnoble.com.

 

Hungarian Goulash

from Rosie’s Riveting Recipes

© Can Stock Photo / fanfo

This historic recipe, included in Rosie’s Riveting Recipes, is great for using up leftovers. However, it includes potatoes as an option. I personally wouldn’t consider it a real Hungarian goulash without the potatoes, or a can of tomatoes for that matter. And if you have any leftover vegetables in the refrigerator you can certainly toss them in as well. Some people like to use ground beef and pasta instead of potatoes, but that would be an American goulash, not a Hungarian goulash. That said, I love American goulash as well.

Gayle Martin

Hungarian Goulash

2 lbs beef chuck, neck or flank meat
2 tablespoons butter, margarine or drippings
1 cup chopped onion
1 cup water
1/8 teaspoon caraway seed (if desired)
1/2 teaspoon marjoram
1 1/2 teaspoon salt
1 clove garlic
paprika

Cut meat into 1-inch cubes. Let onion brown in butter, then add meat and let it brown lightly. Add caraway seed, marjoram, salt, chopped garlic and enough paprika to create a noticeable red color. Add 1 cup water, cover and simmer for 2  1/2 hours. Add more water if necessary. Whole potatoes may be added to the goulash 1/2 hour before done. Some goulash recipes call for the addition of tomatoes. Strained tomatoes may be substituted for water in this recipe. Makes 6 servings.

Note: Serve over noodles or your favorite pasta.

 

Cover photo by Rob Resetar

Rosie’s Riveting Recipes is available on Amazon and Barnesandnoble.com.

 

 

 

New England Turnovers

from the Rosie’s Riveting Recipes historic cookbook
Copyright Can Stock Photo/ ajafoto

Seafood was just as popular in Rosie’s day as it is today. This recipe from the Rosie’s Riveting Recipes historic cookbook is yummy and delicious. However, those who don’t feel comfortable making pastry from scratch should be able to get good results using frozen pie crusts. Butter can also be used in place of margarine.

Gayle Martin

NEW ENGLAND TURNOVERS

Turnover Filling

  • 1 4 oz. package shredded codfish
  • 2 tablespoons margarine
  • 2 tablespoons enriched all purpose flour
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper
  • 1/2 cup milk

Freshen codfish as directed on package. Melt margarine over low heat. Add flour and seasoning and stir until smooth. Add milk, stirring constantly, until smooth and thickened. Add freshened codfish and mix well

Pastry

  • 1/2 cup margarine
  • 1 cup sifted all purpose flour
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 2 to 3 tablespoons water

Sift flour and salt together 3 times. Cut in margarine with a pastry blender or 2 knives until consistency of coarse meal. Add water and toss lightly with a fork until all particles are moistened. Roll out on lightly floured board into an 8 x 22-inch rectangle. Cut into 6 squares.  Heap turnover filling into each square. Fold squares in half. Press edges together with fork dipped in flour. Prick top to allow steam to escape. Bake in hot oven (425• F) 15 minutes. Yield:  6 servings.

Modern adaptation: Fish can be freshened by placing it in a bowl of cold salt water for about 15 minutes. However, if using individually frozen pieces of uncooked fish, this step may not be necessary. Frozen pie shells or pastry can also be used, and any leftover filling can be served as a delicious topping over the turnovers.

 

Book Cover for Rosies Riveting Recipes
Cover photo by Rob Resetar

Rosie’s Riveting Recipes is available on Amazon and Barnesandnoble.com.