Last-Minute Tomato Soup

from the Rosie’s Riveting Recipes Cookbook

I’ve had to make a few lifestyle changes because my hypertension has become chronic. Two years of lockdowns, mask mandates and 24/7 fear mongering would elevate anyone’s blood pressure. However, my medication was no longer working, and nothing else we tried was working either. So, I decided to put myself on a low sodium diet.

It really wasn’t hard. I stopped eating fast food and processed foods, and I started reading food labels. I was shocked at the amount of salt hidden in our foods. It’s way more than our bodies need. So, I’ve gone back to eating real food made from scratch, just like in Rosie’s day. I’d forgotten how good real food actually tasted.

Today’s recipe is an easy to make alternative to canned tomato soup, and if you’re worried about salt simply use low sodium or salt free tomatoes.

By the way, my blood pressure has dropped. I’m also losing weight and I feel so much better.

Thanks, Rosie.

Gayle Martin

Last Minute Tomato Soup

  • 1 cup cooked tomatoes
  • 3 cups rich milk*
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper
  • 1 tablespoon butter, (if desired)

Stir tomatoes well to break up the pulp and juice. Add milk. Heat, stirring frequently. Add salt and pepper and butter, if desired. Serve immediately. Makes 4 servings.

Modern adaptation: Used canned, diced, Italian-style tomatoes to create a flavorful, elegant soup.

* 1940’s term for condensed milk

Book Cover for Rosies Riveting Recipes
Cover photo by Rob Resetar

Imagine the government telling you how much meat or chicken you could buy, or how much sugar or flour you could have. Strange as it may seem, at one time it actually happened. During WWII, the United States government devised a food rationing program to help insure that every family would have enough to eat. Rosie’s Riveting Recipes gives readers a glimpse into life on the WWII home front. A cookbook and a history lesson in one Rosies’s Riveting Recipes includes more than 180 economical, back-to-basics World War II ration recipes and short tales of life on the American home front interspersed throughout.

Rosie’s Riveting Recipes is available on Amazon and Barnesandnoble.com.

 

Southwestern Roast Beef Soup

© Can Stock Photo/
roxanabalint

Once upon a time, in a galaxy far, far away, I rented a booth in an antique mall in Tucson, Arizona.

The mall included a small soup and sandwich shop. Nothing big and fancy, but it was a cozy, quiet place to grab a quick lunch whenever I was there. The food was always top notch.

One day they were serving a southwestern roast beef soup. It tasted like a cross between a beef stew and chili con carne. I wanted to ask for the recipe. However, their soups were usually made from the prior day’s leftovers, so I doubt there was a recipe. So, I did the next best thing. I let my palate decide, and then I came up with my own recipe. It’s a close match, and since it uses leftover roast beef, I’m sure Rosie would have approved.

Sadly, the antique mall is no more. While I made a profit each year, it wasn’t much, and maintaining my booth  was a costly undertaking. I eventually closed it out. The mall itself went out of business a few years later, which I was sorry to see. That said, I have no regrets. I met a lot of interesting people while I was there, and I learned a lot about how the retail business works.

Gayle Martin

Southwestern Roast Beef Soup

½ to 1 pound leftover roast beef (such as round roast), including the pan drippings

  • 1 cup beef stock
  • 1 can diced tomatoes (14.5 ounce)
  • 1 can tomato sauce (14.5 ounce)
  • 1 small can diced green chilis (optional)
  • 1 cup corn or mixed vegetables
  • 3/4 cup small, uncooked pasta, such as a shell pasta
  • 2 teaspoons cumin
  • ½ teaspoon lemon pepper
  • ½ teaspoon black pepper
  • ½ teaspoon salt, if desired

Chop roast beef into small, bite-sized cubes. Blend all the ingredients into a 4 quart stockpot and bring to a boil. If soup is too thick, add more stock until desired consistency. Reduce heat to low and simmer for about 30to 45 minutes or until meat is tender.

***

Book Cover for Rosies Riveting Recipes
Cover photo by Rob Resetar

Imagine the government telling you how much meat or chicken you could buy, or how much sugar or flour you could have. Strange as it may seem, at one time it actually happened. During WWII, the United States government devised a food rationing program to help insure that every family would have enough to eat. Rosie’s Riveting Recipes gives readers a glimpse into life on the WWII home front. A cookbook and a history lesson in one Rosies’s Riveting Recipes includes more than 180 economical, back-to-basics World War II ration recipes and short tales of life on the American home front interspersed throughout.

Rosie’s Riveting Recipes is available on Amazon and Barnesandnoble.com.

Quick and Easy Taco Soup

© Can Stock Photo/ ccat82

The other day I came across a couple cans of diced tomatoes I bought by accident. They had diced green chilies in them, and I always buy plain canned tomatoes.

No worries. Like Rosie, of the Rosie’s Riveting Recipes historic cookbook, I don’t throw food out. I see mistakes like this one as a happy accident and a chance to try something new and different. So, after browsing a few online recipes for inspiration, I came up with my own creation. It’s so good that I’ll have to make it again.

Gayle Martin

 

QUICK AND EASY TACO SOUP

  • 1 pound lean ground beef
  • 1 small onion, chopped
  • 2 cans diced tomatoes with green chilies (14.5 oz), OR
  • 2 cans plain diced tomatoes with one small can diced green chilies
  • 1 can corn
  • 1 can black beans
  • 1 small can tomato sauce
  • 2 cups beef broth or water
  • 1 package taco seasoning mix
  • 1 teaspoon salt (optional)
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper

Brown ground beef and onion in a skillet. Drain, and place in small stockpot. Add canned tomatoes, green chilies, corn, black beans and tomato sauce. Add beef broth or water and stir well. Add seasonings. Stir, bring to a boil, turn heat to low, and simmer for approximately ten minutes. Top with broken tortilla chips and cheese, or with a dollop of sour cream and chopped green onions.

 

Cover photo by Robert Resetar.

Imagine the government telling you how much meat or chicken you could buy, or how much sugar or flour you could have. Strange as it may seem, at one time it actually happened. During WWII, the United States government devised a food rationing program to help insure that every family would have enough to eat. Rosie’s Riveting Recipes gives readers a glimpse into life on the WWII home front. A cookbook and a history lesson in one Rosies’s Riveting Recipes includes more than 180 economical, back-to-basics World War II ration recipes and short tales of life on the American home front interspersed throughout.

Rosie’s Riveting Recipes is available on Amazon and Barnesandnoble.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Twice Baked Red Potato Soup

© Can Stock Photo / yekophotostudio

Someone gave me a big bag of red potatoes. Yummy! I love red potatoes. In fact, red potatoes are my favorite potato. So, with such a big bag, I decided to do some experimenting. After all, you can’t go wrong with red potatoes. I started with my basic potato soup recipe, from the Rosie’s Riveting Recipes historic cookbook. From there I came up with something amazing. This dish is economical, easy to prepare, and delicious.

Gayle Martin

 

TWICE BAKED RED POTATO SOUP

  • 4 to 6 medium to large red potatoes
  • 1/2 medium sized onion, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 1 teaspoon minced garlic
  • 1 quart milk
  • 2 to 3 slices cooked bacon
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon paprika
  • 1/2 cup grated cheddar cheese
  • 1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese

Peel red potatoes and slice into small cubes. Set aside. Drop butter into a small stock pot and melt over medium heat. Add onion and garlic and saute for about 5 minutes. Once the onions are caramelized, add the milk and potatoes. Break bacon into small pieces and drop into soup. Add seasonings and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low, cover and simmer, stirring occasionally, for 20 minutes or until the potatoes are cooked. Add cheeses, stir and simmer until melted. Serve with warm bread.

Book Cover for Rosies Riveting Recipes
Cover photo by Rob Resetar

Rosie’s Riveting Recipes invites readers to take a trip back in time in their own kitchen. With over 180 economical, back-to-basics World War II era ration recipes, historic posters, and tales of life on the American homefront, Rosie’s Riveting Recipes truly is an interactive history book.

Rosie’s Riveting Recipes is available on Amazon and BarnesandNoble.com.

 

 

 

Fifteen Bean Soup

© Can Stock Photo/
roxanabalint

There is nothing better than a bowl of hot, homemade soup on a cold winter day, and this recipe is probably the easiest one I know. The ingredients are also inexpensive, making it one of my most economical recipes as well. The soup can be served on its own or as a side dish. While not included in the Rosie’s Riveting Recipes historic cookbook, I’m sure Rosie would have approved. Enjoy.

Gayle Martin

FIFTEEN BEAN SOUP

  • 1 package dried fifteen beans or mixed beans
  • 1 can beef broth
  • 1 can diced tomatoes with green chili
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons minced garlic
  • 1 teaspoon black pepper
  • seasoning packet (if included with the beans)
  • 1 – 2 tablespoons salt (optional)
  • 1 cup cubed ham (optional)

Soak beans overnight in a bowl of cold water. The following morning pour beans into a colander and rinse thoroughly, removing any loose skins. Place beans into a large stockpot, add enough water to completely submerge the beans, and remove any loose skins that may float to the top. Place on stove and heat to boiling over medium heat.

If the water appears foamy after it begins to boil turn off heat and pour beans back into colander. Rinse thoroughly and remove any loose skins. Pour beans back into stockpot, add enough water to submerge the beans, removing any loose skins, and once again heat to boiling over medium heat. Repeat this process if the water appears foamy again.

Once water appears less foamy, add the remaining ingredients, cover and simmer on low for approximately six hours or until beans are soft and tender. Serve with biscuits or cornbread. This soup is also a good side dish steaks or burgers.

Book Cover for Rosies Riveting Recipes
Cover photo by Rob Resetar

Imagine the government telling you how much meat or chicken you could buy, or how much sugar or flour you could have. Strange as it may seem, at one time it actually happened. During WWII, the United States government devised a food rationing program to help insure that every family would have enough to eat. Rosie’s Riveting Recipes gives readers a glimpse into life on the WWII home front. A cookbook and a history lesson in one Rosies’s Riveting Recipes includes more than 180 economical, back-to-basics World War II ration recipes and short tales of life on the American home front interspersed throughout.

Rosie’s Riveting Recipes is available on Amazon and Barnesandnoble.com.

Mediterranean Style Clam Chowder

© Can Stock Photo / cozyta

The following is one of my all time favorite recipes, but it’s not part of the Rosie’s Riveting Recipes historic cookbook. It’s a recipe I’ve created myself with love and a lot of trial and error as a tasty alternative clam chowder for those with milk allergies or who may be lactose intolerant. It’s like a cross between New England and Manhattan style clam chowder, and I added some Italian seasonings to give it a little extra zing. I hope you enjoy it as much as I do.

Gayle Martin

MEDITERRANEAN STYLE CLAM CHOWDER

  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic or garlic powder
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 2 cups water
  • 2 to 3 medium sized red potatoes, diced into small cubes
  • 1 teaspoon salt (optional)
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper
  • 1 can diced, peeled tomatoes (14.5 ounce)
  • 1 can baby clams (10 ounce)
  • 1/2 teaspoon basil, bay leaves and Italian seasoning
  • 1 tablespoon Wondra flour or cornstarch

Chop onion and place in small stockpot with olive oil and melted butter. Add minced garlic. Sauté until the onions are soft and the garlic turns light brown. Add water, diced potatoes, salt (if desired), and pepper. Bring to a boil, cover, reduce heat, and simmer on low for 10 minutes.

Add diced tomatoes. Strain the clam juice into a small mixing bowl and add the clams to the soup mixture. Add Wondra flour or cornstarch to the clam juice and stir until all flour is dissolved and juice mixture is free of lumps. Add the juice mixture to the soup and stir thoroughly. Add garlic powder, (if not using minced garlic), basil, bay leaves, and Italian seasoning. Stir and bring the soup back to a boil. Reduce heat, cover, and simmer on low for an additional ten minutes. Serve with rolls or garlic bread.

 

Cover photo by Rob Resetar

Imagine the government telling you how much meat or chicken you could buy, or how much sugar or flour you could have. Strange as it may seem, at one time it actually happened. During WWII, the United States government devised a food rationing program to help insure that every family would have enough to eat. Rosie’s Riveting Recipes gives readers a glimpse into life on the WWII home front. A cookbook and a history lesson in one Rosies’s Riveting Recipes includes more than 180 economical, back-to-basics World War II ration recipes and short tales of life on the American home front interspersed throughout.

Rosie’s Riveting Recipes is available on Amazon and Barnesandnoble.com.

Larry’s Italian Wedding Soup

© Can Stock Photo/ bruhum

Writing is something I truly love doing. Along with writing Rosie’s Riveting Recipes, I write contemporary romance novels under the name Marina Martindale. Each of my novels includes a scene in which a character cooks something wonderful, and I include the recipe at the back of the book.

This recipe is from my first contemporary romance novel, The Reunion. I love Italian wedding soup, so Larry, a seventeen-year-old aspiring chef, has prepared it for his ailing brother, saying it’s his grandmother’s recipe. In reality, however, this recipe is my own creation. It comes from a combination of several different Italian wedding soup recipes, along with a little trial and error.

Gayle Martin

Larry’s ITALIAN WEDDING SOUP

For the meatballs

  • 1 pound ground beef*
  • 1/4 cup breadcrumbs
  • 1 teaspoon Italian seasoning blend
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon pepper
  • 1 egg

Preheat oven to 350F. Combine all ingredients in a mixing bowl and knead together like a meatloaf. Roll into small meatballs, about 1/2 to 1 inch in diameter. Place on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper and bake for 25 to 30 minutes, or until brown. Set aside.

For the soup

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1/2 medium sized yellow onion, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic
  • 3 carrots, peeled and sliced (optional)
  • 2 stalks celery, sliced (optional)
  • I package of fresh mushrooms (optional)
  • 10 cups, (2 1/2 quarts) chicken stock
  • 1/2 cup dry white wine (such as Chardonnay)
  • 1 egg, well beaten
  • 1 cup small pasta (such as stars or small sea shells)
  • 2 teaspoons salt (if desired)
  • 1/2 teaspoon pepper
  • 1 tablespoon dill
  • 12 ounces fresh spinach, washed and trimmed**

While the meatballs are baking saute the onion, garlic, carrots, celery, (if desired), and fresh mushrooms, (if desired),  in olive oil in a stockpot for approximately 5 to 6 minutes. Add chicken stock and white wine and bring to a boil. Once the soup mixture is boiling beat egg in a small mixing bowl with a whisk until slightly frothy. Pour egg slowly and incrementally into soup mixture, whisking the soup mixture continuously until all of the egg has been added. Add pasta, salt, (if desired) and pepper and allow mixture to simmer for about 6 to 8 minutes, or until pasta is soft. Add meatballs and dill. Cover and simmer on low for another 10 minutes. Add spinach and simmer for another 1 to 2 minutes before serving. Once soup is ladled into bowls top with grated Parmesan cheese.

* Ground chicken or ground turkey may also be used, or 1/2 pound of your favorite ground meat can be mixed with 1/2 of ground pork.

**Frozen or canned spinach may be substituted for fresh spinach

Rosie’s Riveting Recipes includes many delicious historic soup recipes. Please click on the link for a free preview.

Cover photo by Robert Resetar.

Hungarian Goulash

from Rosie’s Riveting Recipes

© Can Stock Photo / fanfo

This historic recipe, included in Rosie’s Riveting Recipes, is great for using up leftovers. However, it includes potatoes as an option. I personally wouldn’t consider it a real Hungarian goulash without the potatoes, or a can of tomatoes for that matter. And if you have any leftover vegetables in the refrigerator you can certainly toss them in as well. Some people like to use ground beef and pasta instead of potatoes, but that would be an American goulash, not a Hungarian goulash. That said, I love American goulash as well.

Gayle Martin

Hungarian Goulash

2 lbs beef chuck, neck or flank meat
2 tablespoons butter, margarine or drippings
1 cup chopped onion
1 cup water
1/8 teaspoon caraway seed (if desired)
1/2 teaspoon marjoram
1 1/2 teaspoon salt
1 clove garlic
paprika

Cut meat into 1-inch cubes. Let onion brown in butter, then add meat and let it brown lightly. Add caraway seed, marjoram, salt, chopped garlic and enough paprika to create a noticeable red color. Add 1 cup water, cover and simmer for 2  1/2 hours. Add more water if necessary. Whole potatoes may be added to the goulash 1/2 hour before done. Some goulash recipes call for the addition of tomatoes. Strained tomatoes may be substituted for water in this recipe. Makes 6 servings.

Note: Serve over noodles or your favorite pasta.

 

Cover photo by Rob Resetar

Rosie’s Riveting Recipes is available on Amazon and Barnesandnoble.com.

 

 

 

Historic Potato Soup

From the Rosie’s Riveting Recipes historic cookbook
© Can Stock Photo / olenayemchuk

There’s nothing quite like a bowl of hot soup on a cold winter day, and who doesn’t love potatoes? Potato soup is economical and easy to prepare. You can also add other ingredients such as ham, green onions, cheese. It’s like having a baked potato in a bowl. 

This classic dish comes from the Rosie’s Riveting Recipes historic cookbook. No doubt is it similar to the way Grandma used to make it.

Gayle Martin

 

POTATO SOUP

  • 2 cups raw potatoes
  • 2 tablespoons margarine*
  • 1 tablespoon chopped onion
  • 1 quart milk
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • pepper

Chop potatoes fine or grate them. Add potatoes, margarine, and onion to the milk. Cook the mixture over low heat until the potatoes are tender, stirring regularly. By that time the starch from the potatoes will have thickened the milk slightly. Add salt and pepper.

Modern Variation: To give this soup some extra zing try adding bacon, ham, or corn.

*Butter or olive oil may be used instead of margarine.

 

***

Imagine the government telling you how much meat or chicken you could buy, or how much sugar or flour you could have. Strange as it may seem, at one time it actually happened. During WW 2, the United States government devised a food rationing program to help insure that every family would have enough to eat. Rosie’s Riveting Recipes gives a glimpse into life on the WW 2 home front. Rosie’s Riveting Recipes is available on Amazon,  Barnesandnoble.com, and other fine booksellers

 

 

How to Make Minestrone

© Can Stock Photo/ robynmac

Minestrone has always been one of my favorite soups, but when I did an online search for recipes I found so many variations it made my head spin. Suffice to say minestrone is one of those dishes intended for using up leftovers, and for that it works quite nicely. I can clean out my fridge and create a tasty dish at the same time. Best of all, it’s never the same twice.

As I created my own version of minestrone I noticed I used a few ingredients consistently. The rest was whatever I happened to have on hand, which is why I’m leaving plenty of leeway on my ingredients list.

By the way, Rosie, of the Rosie’s Riveting Recipes historic cookbook, would have approved. She never let leftovers go to waste.

Gayle Martin

MINESTRONE

  • 2 to 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon butter (optional)
  • 1 small onion, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic (optional)
  • 1 cup sliced celery (optional)
  • 1 bell pepper, chopped (optional)
  • 1 or 2 carrots, sliced (optional)
  • 1 small (8 oz) can tomato sauce
  • 2 cups chicken broth or water
  • 1 can garbanzo beans
  • Other leftover vegetables, such as corn, lima beans, chopped zucchini or cubed potatoes
  • 3/4 cup small pasta, such as stars, small shells, or mini farfalle
  • 1 teaspoon salt (optional)
  • 1 tablespoon basil
  • 1 tablespoon parsley
  • 1 teaspoon Italian seasoning
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 package of spinach, fresh, frozen or canned

Heat oil and butter, if desired, in a stock pot and saute the onion, garlic, bell pepper, carrots or celery. Cook for approximately 5 minutes or until the vegetables are tender. Add tomato sauce and broth or water. Stir well. Add any remaining vegetables, garbanzo beans, seasonings and pasta. Heat to a boil. Cover, reduce heat, and simmer for twenty minutes. Add spinach and simmer for another minute or two. Serve with bread, rolls or corn muffins.

 

Cover photo by Robert Resetar.

Rosie’s Riveting Recipes is available on Amazon and Barnesandnoble.com.