Pigs In Blankets

from the Rosie’s Riveting Recipes historic cookbook
Book Cover for Rosies Riveting Recipes
Cover photo by Rob Resetar

Some dishes are destined to become classics, and this is certainly one of them. I loved pigs in a blanket when I was a kid, and I still enjoy them as an adult. This historic recipe from Rosie’s Riveting Recipes is easy, timeless, and delicious. Try it with your favorite fixings, or top it with chili, cheese and chopped onions.

Gayle Martin

 

PIGS IN BLANKETS

8 – 10 wieners or frankfurters

Bisquick

Simmer wieners in hot water for 10 minutes. Make Bisquick biscuit dough from package. Roll thin-cut in squares. Wrap wieners or franks (having ends show). Seal side edge by pinching together. Bake 15 minutes in hot oven. (450F) Serves 8 to 10.

Modern Adaption

Use Pillsbury Crescent Rolls instead of Bisquick

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B 1 Biscuits

from the Rosie’s Riveting Recipes historic cookbook

I grew up eating homemade biscuits. Biscuits and gravy was a Sunday morning breakfast staple when I was a kid. I’d wander into the kitchen, and there was Mom, or Dad, throwing some flour and shortening into a bowl, and rolling out the biscuit dough. Sometimes they’d let me cut out the biscuits with a water glass. The whole family loved fresh, homemade biscuits, and I still love biscuits today. Either smothered in gravy, or with hot, melted butter.

This historic biscuit recipe, however, is a little different than the biscuits my family baked.  These biscuits are unique and quite tasty. I would call them a cross between a biscuit and a muffin. The dough has the consistency of muffin dough, but it isn’t sweet like a muffin. I also like the subtle peanut butter flavor. It’s a nice complement to bacon and eggs, and tastes great with butter and honey.

Gayle Martin

 

B1 BISCUITS

  • 1 1/2 cups enriched all purpose flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 2 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 cups oats
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 2 tablespoons margarine*
  • 3 tablespoons peanut butter
  • 1 cup milk

Sift and measure flour. Resift with salt and baking powder. Stir in oats and sugar. Cut in margarine and peanut butter and add milk. Mix very lightly. Fill well-greased muffin pans 1/2 full. Brush tops with milk. Bake at 450• F for 20-25 minutes. Yield: 12 biscuits.

  • butter or shortening may be used instead of margarine
About the Rosie’s Riveting Recipes Cookbook
Cover photo by Robert Resetar.

Imagine the government telling you how much meat or chicken you could buy, or how much sugar or flour you could have. Strange as it may seem, at one time it actually happened. During WWII, the United States government devised a food rationing program to help insure that every family would have enough to eat. Rosie’s Riveting Recipes gives a glimpse into life on the WWII home front. A cookbook and a history lesson in one with more than 180 economical, back-to-basics World War 2 ration recipes with short tales of life on the American home front interspersed throughout.

 

 

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Eggless Chocolate Cake

© Can Stock Photo / NewIllustrations

Food was scarce back in Rosie’s day, and many common items on grocery shelves were hard to come by, even with rationing. Food companies had to come up with new recipes to make scarce ingredients go further, or even eliminate them completely. This delicious historic recipe, from the Rosie’s Riveting Recipes cookbook, omits eggs.

By the way, a rotary beater was another term for an eggbeater, although most of us today use whisks.

Gayle Martin

EGGLESS CHOCOLATE CAKE

2 squares unsweetened chocolate
1 cup milk
1 3/4 cups sifted flour
3/4 teaspoon soda
3/4 teaspoon salt
1 cup sugar
1/3 cup shortening
1 teaspoon vanilla

Combine chocolate and milk in top of double boiler and cook over rapidly boiling water 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Blend with rotary egg beater; cool.

Sift flour once, measure, add soda, salt, and sugar, and sift together three times. Cream shortening, add flour, vanilla, and chocolate mixture. Stir until all flour is dampened. Then beat vigorously 1 minute. Bake in two greased and lightly floured 8-inch layer pans in moderate oven (375 F) 20 minutes, or until done. Spread frosting between layers and on top of cake.

Cocoa Cake: Substitute 1/3 cup cocoa for chocolate. Sift it with the dry ingredients; add cold milk with vanilla.

For a free preview of the Rosie’s Riveting Recipes historic cookbook please click on the link below.

Cover photo by Robert Resetar.

PREVIEW ON AMAZON

 

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Our Mother’s Recipes — Yellow Cornbread

© Can Stock Photo / zigzagmtart

There’s nothing quite like the taste of fresh baked cornbread made from scratch. This recipe came from a friend’s mother’s recipe box, and no doubt lots of other mothers and grandmothers used the same, or a similar recipe. It’s the perfect side for homemade soups, such as Split Pea Soup, for the Rosie’s Riveting Recipes historic cookbook, and my own Chili con Carne recipe.

Gayle Martin

YELLOW CORNBREAD

  • 1 cup yellow cornmeal
  • 1 cup sifted flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/3 cup soft shortening
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1 egg

Sift dry ingredients together into a mixing bowl. Cut in shortening until well blended. Beat milk and egg together in a small mixing bowl and mix with dry ingredients until just blended. Pour into a well-greased 8 x 8 inch baking pan. Bake in a hot (400• F) oven for 25 minutes or until done.

For a sweeter cornbread sift 1/4 cup sugar with the dry ingredients, and cut shortening to 1/4 cup. This batter is also good for baking corn muffins or corn sticks.

For more information about the Rosie’s Riveting Recipes historic cookbook please click here for a free preview.

Cover photo by Robert Resetar.
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Fresh Fruit Cobbler

© Can Stock Photo / roxanabalint

The things you will find after your kitchen has been remodeled. This time it was scrap of paper with my mother’s fruit cobbler recipe, written in her own handwriting. I’m so happy to have found it as I thought this was one recipe that was gone for good. Her fruit cobblers were amazing, and she often served them with breakfast. They’re also super easy to make and fabulous for dessert too.

Mom usually made hers with peaches, but other fruits, such as blackberries, blueberries or raspberries, would also work.

Gayle Martin

FRESH FRUIT COBBLER

  • 4 to 6 fresh peaches, peeled and sliced, OR
  • 3 to 4 packages fresh raspberries, blueberries or blackberries
  • 2/3 cup sugar
  • 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • pinch of cinnamon, if desired

Preheat oven to 350F. Mix fresh fruit, sugar and flour in a mixing bowl. Add cinnamon, if desired. Pour into an 8 x 8-inch baking pan. Cut butter into small pieces and sprinkle on top.

Topping

  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/3 cup vegetable oil
  • 3 tablespoons milk
  • 1 egg

Mix all ingredients together in a medium sized mixing bowl. Drop by spoonful over the fruit mixture. Bake for 30 to 25 minutes or until the topping is brown.

Other delicious cobbler recipes can be found in the Rosie’s Riveting Recipes historic cookbook. Please click here for more information.

Cover photo by Robert Resetar.
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Cranberry Surprise Muffins

© Can Stock Photo / margo555

It’s that time of year when we’re haunted by a ghost of holidays past. The leftover cranberry sauce. Well, fear not. Cranberries are a healthy food which they say also helps maintain a healthy bladder, and there are ways to create something delicious with that leftover sauce. This recipe came from a friend’s mother’s recipe box. It’s easy to prepare and a delicious, and if you love cranberries you can enjoy them year round.

Gayle Martin

CRANBERRY SURPRISE MUFFINS

  • 1 12 oz package corn muffin mix
  • 1/3 cup canned whole cranberry sauce
  • 1/4 teaspoon grated orange rind

Preheat oven to 400F. Grease muffin tins or use paper baking cups.  Prepare muffin mix according to the package directions and, in a separate bowl, combine cranberry sauce and orange rind. Fill each cup about halfway, drop a teaspoonful of cranberry mixture, and top with a small amount of batter. Bake 15 minutes or until muffins are brown. Makes approximately 12 muffins.

Other delicious muffin recipes can be found in the Rosie’s Riveting Recipes historic cookbook. Please click here for a free preview.

Cover photo by Robert Resetar.
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Peppermint Candy Layer Cake

© Can Stock Photo / urbanlight

Just in time for Christmas baking, this delicious holiday dessert from the pages of the Rosie’s Riveting Recipes historic cookbook, is perfect for the season.

Gayle Martin

PEPPERMINT CANDY LAYER CAKE

  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1/2 cup margarine
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 2 eggs
  • 2/3 cups milk
  • 2 cups cake flour
  • 2 1/2 teaspoons baking powder

Cream together margarine, sugar and salt. Stir in beaten eggs. Sift flour with baking powder twice. Add flour mixture alternately with milk, about 1/2 of each at a time. Pour into two 8-inch layer pans, lined with paper or greased with margarine and floured. Bake at 375F for 35 minutes. When cool put layers together with white icing. Decorate with peppermint candy using whole sticks on top, crushed on sides.

Modern Variation: Since today’s baking powders are double-acting decrease baking powder to 1 1/4 teaspoon. For best results use a small (6 cup) bundt pan, a medium (8 x 4 inch) loaf pan, or an 8 x 8 inch square pan. To add some peppermint flavor add 3/4 teaspoon peppermint extract. If desired, top with Whipped Cream Topping.

WHIPPED CREAM TOPPING

  • 1 cup whipping cream
  • 1/2 cup crushed peppermint candy
  • or 1/2 cup crushed peanut brittle
  • or 4 tablespoons jam or marmalade

Whip whipping cream until stiff. Fold in crushed candy or jam or marmalade.

Modern Variation: For peppermint candy topping add 1/4 teaspoon peppermint extract to give the topping more peppermint flavor

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Chocolate Chocolate Chip Cookies

© Can Stock Photo / NorGal

Chocolate may have been rationed in Rosie’s day, but fortunately for us, those days are long gone. There really is no such thing as too much chocolate, at least not when you’re a chocolate lover like me. During the holidays what better way to celebrate than to add a few touches to a classic recipe and go for the chocolate. This recipe is my own creation, inspired by the classic Nestle Toll House recipe.

Gayle Martin

CHOCOLATE CHOCOLATE CHIP COOKIES

• 2 sticks butter or margarine, softened
• 3/4 cup sugar
• 3/4 cup brown sugar
• 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
• 2 eggs
• 1 cup cocoa
• 2 tablespoons coffee (if desired)
• 2 1/4 cups flour
• 1 teaspoon salt
• 1 teaspoon baking soda
• 1 large (12 oz) package of chocolate chips

Preheat oven to 350F. Place flour, baking soda and salt on a piece of wax paper and set aside. Cream butter, sugar, brown sugar and vanilla together in a large mixing bowl. Blend in eggs, mixing thoroughly. Add cocoa and coffee, if desired, and mix thoroughly. Blend in dry ingredients, a little at a time, until moistened. Fold in chocolate chips. Drop by rounded teaspoon full onto an ungreased cookie sheet and bake for approximately 10 to 12 minutes.

Note: If the batter should become too dry and crumbly after adding flour simply add small increments of coffee or water, (one tablespoon or smaller), until moistened.

For a little more zing, use pumpkin spice flavored chips, if available, or add a teaspoon of cinnamon or pumpkin pie spice.

Rosie’s Riveting Recipes includes a number of delicious historic cookie recipes. Please click here for a free preview.

Cover photo by Robert Resetar.
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Turkey and Stuffing Casserole

© Can Stock Photo / MSPhotographics

Post-holiday leftovers are great, and, just like in Rosie’s time, we don’t want them going to waste. However, they can also take up a lot of space in your refrigerator, so here’s a delicious recipe to combine your holiday leftovers into a single casserole dish, saving space in the fridge.

Gayle Martin

 

TURKEY AND STUFFING CASSEROLE

• Vegetable Cooking Spray

• 1 can cream of mushroom soup

• 1 1/2 cups milk, chicken broth or water

• 1 package frozen broccoli, cauliflower and carrot combination, thawed, (or other leftover vegetables)

• 2 cups cubed leftover turkey

• 3 to 4 cups leftover stuffing

• 1/4 cup leftover cranberry sauce (optional)

• 2 tablespoons butter, melted

• 1/4 cup breadcrumbs

Preheat oven to 400F and spray nonstick cooking spray into a 12 x 8 x 2 inch baking dish. Set aside.

Stir soup and liquid in a large mixing bowl until well blended. Add vegetables, turkey, stuffing and cranberry sauce, if desired, and mix thoroughly. Pour mixture into baking dish. Melt butter in the microwave and add the breadcrumbs, stirring until they are moistened. Sprinkle the breadcrumbs over the top of the turkey mixture.

Bake for 20 minutes or until sauce is bubbling.

Note: If you’re short on stuffing slice bread into small cubes and add to stuffing. If you prefer a creamier casserole, add more broth or milk.

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Victory Pie Crust

A photo of a freshly made pie crust ready to be filled.
© Can Stock Photo / StephanieFrey

from the Rosie’s Riveting Recipes cookbook

One of my earliest childhood memories is of standing on a stool, in front of the kitchen counter, watching my mother make a pie crust from scratch. She could sculpt the crust on the rim of the pie plate like Picasso, and she’d always break off little pieces and let me taste it. The raw dough was delicious. (It still is.)

Sadly, my mother soon stopped baking pies. She always said her mother could whip up a pie crust with virtually no effort at all, so perhaps my mother felt that she simply couldn’t compete with Grandma’s pies. Whatever the reason, her homemade pies virtually disappeared from the family menu, and, on those rare occasions when she did bake a pie, she used the frozen pie shells.

Fast forward. I’m testing recipes for my historic cookbook, Rosie’s Riveting Recipes, and the time had come for to try making my own pie crust from scratch. I’d never done it before, but they say certain genes skip a generation. I soon discovered that making pie crust from scratch isn’t rocket science. All you need is flour, baking powder, shortening, and a little water. Having the right tools helps too. I bought a pastry cutter at Walmart, and that investment of a few dollars really paid off because it makes blending in the shortening a snap.

Victory Pie Crust is used in many of the historic recipes in Rosie’s Riveting Recipes. And one other historic note. The word, “victory,” was a significant part of the lexicon during World War II. It was a moral booster that was used everywhere.

Gayle Martin

VICTORY PIE CRUST

  • 1 1/4 cups sifted flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 3 or 4 tablespoons cold shortening
  • 3 or 3 1/2 tablespoons ice water*

Sift flour once, measure, add baking powder and salt, and sift again. Cut shortening into small pieces; add to flour and cut in until mixture is almost as fine as meal. Make small well in flour mixture. Turn 1 tablespoon ice water in this and mix quickly and lightly with surrounding flour only until a small ball of dough is formed. Do not over mix. Repeat this way, mixing all of the flour in separate portions. Then press portions together lightly but firmly into one dough. Makes enough pastry for 9-inch pie shell. Double recipe for pastry for two-crust pie.

*Use only 3 tablespoons ice water with 4 tablespoons shortening; use 3 1/2 tablespoons ice water with 3 tablespoons shortening.

Note: If the crust should come out too dry and crumbly simply add small amounts of water until the mixture has a more doughy consistency.

 

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