Roast Beef a Classic Comfort Food

Photo by Gayle Martin

Sometimes I wonder if I may have been a cannibal in a previous life. I’ve always preferred my beef cooked rare. Whether it’s a T-bone, a rib eye, or roast beef, for me it always tastes best when it’s rare or medium rare.

Roast beef was a staple on our dinner table when I was growing up. It’s so versatile and it comes in many cuts, such as tri-tip, chuck roast, and rump roasts. My personal favorite is prime rib, which I sometimes order on special occasions when I’m eating out. At home I prefer the top round. If it’s unavailable, or too expensive, I can make do with a bottom round. Both cuts are flavorful and reasonably priced. 

The secret to cooking any roast, regardless of the cut, is a good meat thermometer. It takes the out guesswork, giving you the best results. I bake my roasts in a 350 degree Fahrenheit oven, and set the timer to allow 20 to 30 minutes per pound.

For rare to medium rare, I roast the meat until it reaches an internal temperature between 115 and 140 degrees Fahrenheit. Those who prefer medium should cook it until it reaches 145 to 170 degrees, with well done being 170 degrees and above. 

Once the desired internal temperature is reached I remove the roast from the oven and allow it to rest for about 10 minutes before carving. Add some mashed potatoes and gravy, and you’ll have yourself a delicious plate of good, old-fashioned comfort food.

One final note. You can alway cook your roast a little longer if it’s too rare, but if it overcooks you can’t go back and fix it. Be sure to keep a close watch while it’s roasting. 

Gayle Martin

 

Homemade Vanilla Ice Cream

© Can Stock Photo / OG_vision

It’s been a long, hot summer here in Texas, and it’s probably been a hot summer where you live as well. I was born and raised in Phoenix, and I feel like I’ve been somehow transported back there. My cousins all tell me they’ve had record breaking heat this year in Arizona as well.

There’s nothing like ice cream on a hot summer day. I remember when my grandparents would make ice cream when I was a kid. They had an old school ice cream maker which required a lot of salt. My siblings and I kept adding salt while my grandfather turned the crank. When it was ready we had vanilla ice cream which tasted much better than the store bought kind.

Ice cream was popular summertime treat in Rosie’s day as well. This recipe, from the Rosie’s Riveting Recipes historic cookbook, uses simple ingredients and doesn’t require a machine. You can also make chocolate or fruit flavored ice cream if you prefer. 

Enjoy.

Gayle Martin

VANILLA ICE CREAM

  • 1 cup scalded milk*
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 4 tablespoons flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup cream, whipped
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla

Pour scalded milk into a mixture of sugar, flour and salt. Cook over hot water for 20 minutes (until slightly thick). Cool. Fold in whipped cream and vanilla. Freeze until firm, stirring occasionally. Serves 6.

Chocolate Ice Cream: Add 3 tablespoons cocoa to flour mixture.

Fruit Ice Cream: Add 11/2 cups mashed fresh fruit pulp, sweetened to taste, to cooked mixture.

Cover photo by Robert Resetar

Imagine the government telling you how much meat or chicken you could buy, or how much sugar or flour you could have. Strange as it may seem, at one time it actually happened. During WW 2, the United States government devised a food rationing program to help insure that every family would have enough to eat. Rosie’s Riveting Recipes gives a glimpse into life on the WW 2 home front. A cookbook and a history lesson in one with more than 180 economical, back-to-basics World War 2 ration recipes with short tales of life on the American home front interspersed throughout.

Rosie’s Riveting Recipes is available on Amazon, Barnesandnoble.com, and with other online booksellers

Classic Swiss Steak

© Can Stock Photo / roxanabalint

This is a classic recipe I learned from my mother, and it’s become one of my personal favorites. It’s easy to prepare and tasty. Best of all, it’s delicious, so enjoy.

CLASSIC SWISS STEAK

  • 2 pound round steak, 1 inch thick
  • ¼ cup all-purpose flour
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • ¼ cup beef broth or water
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • ½ bell pepper, chopped
  • 1 can diced tomatoes
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Mix flour, salt and pepper together in a bowl. Cut round steak into 5 or 6 pieces and coat both sides with the flour mixture. Pour oil into skillet, turn on heat to medium, and brown steaks until brown, approximately 7 to 10 minutes per side. Add broth, cover and reduce hit to low. Simmer for 1 hour, adding more broth or water as needed. Turn steaks over, add onions, bell pepper, and canned tomatoes. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Simmer an additional 30 minutes or until vegetables are tender.

 

Cover photo by Rob Resetar

Imagine the government telling you how much meat or chicken you could buy, or how much sugar or flour you could have. Strange as it may seem, at one time it actually happened. During WWII, the United States government devised a food rationing program to help insure that every family would have enough to eat. Rosie’s Riveting Recipes gives a glimpse into life on the WW 2 home front. A cookbook and a history lesson in one with more than 180 economical, back-to-basics World WarII ration recipes with short tales of life on the American home front interspersed throughout.

Rosie’s Riveting Recipes is available on Amazon and Barnesandnoble.com.

 

 

 

Last-Minute Tomato Soup

from the Rosie’s Riveting Recipes Cookbook

I’ve had to make a few lifestyle changes because my hypertension has become chronic. Two years of lockdowns, mask mandates and 24/7 fear mongering would elevate anyone’s blood pressure. However, my medication was no longer working, and nothing else we tried was working either. So, I decided to put myself on a low sodium diet.

It really wasn’t hard. I stopped eating fast food and processed foods, and I started reading food labels. I was shocked at the amount of salt hidden in our foods. It’s way more than our bodies need. So, I’ve gone back to eating real food made from scratch, just like in Rosie’s day. I’d forgotten how good real food actually tasted.

Today’s recipe is an easy to make alternative to canned tomato soup, and if you’re worried about salt simply use low sodium or salt free tomatoes.

By the way, my blood pressure has dropped. I’m also losing weight and I feel so much better.

Thanks, Rosie.

Gayle Martin

Last Minute Tomato Soup

  • 1 cup cooked tomatoes
  • 3 cups rich milk*
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper
  • 1 tablespoon butter, (if desired)

Stir tomatoes well to break up the pulp and juice. Add milk. Heat, stirring frequently. Add salt and pepper and butter, if desired. Serve immediately. Makes 4 servings.

Modern adaptation: Used canned, diced, Italian-style tomatoes to create a flavorful, elegant soup.

* 1940’s term for condensed milk

Book Cover for Rosies Riveting Recipes
Cover photo by Rob Resetar

Imagine the government telling you how much meat or chicken you could buy, or how much sugar or flour you could have. Strange as it may seem, at one time it actually happened. During WWII, the United States government devised a food rationing program to help insure that every family would have enough to eat. Rosie’s Riveting Recipes gives readers a glimpse into life on the WWII home front. A cookbook and a history lesson in one Rosies’s Riveting Recipes includes more than 180 economical, back-to-basics World War II ration recipes and short tales of life on the American home front interspersed throughout.

Rosie’s Riveting Recipes is available on Amazon and Barnesandnoble.com.

 

Southwestern Roast Beef Soup

© Can Stock Photo/
roxanabalint

Once upon a time, in a galaxy far, far away, I rented a booth in an antique mall in Tucson, Arizona.

The mall included a small soup and sandwich shop. Nothing big and fancy, but it was a cozy, quiet place to grab a quick lunch whenever I was there. The food was always top notch.

One day they were serving a southwestern roast beef soup. It tasted like a cross between a beef stew and chili con carne. I wanted to ask for the recipe. However, their soups were usually made from the prior day’s leftovers, so I doubt there was a recipe. So, I did the next best thing. I let my palate decide, and then I came up with my own recipe. It’s a close match, and since it uses leftover roast beef, I’m sure Rosie would have approved.

Sadly, the antique mall is no more. While I made a profit each year, it wasn’t much, and maintaining my booth  was a costly undertaking. I eventually closed it out. The mall itself went out of business a few years later, which I was sorry to see. That said, I have no regrets. I met a lot of interesting people while I was there, and I learned a lot about how the retail business works.

Gayle Martin

Southwestern Roast Beef Soup

½ to 1 pound leftover roast beef (such as round roast), including the pan drippings

  • 1 cup beef stock
  • 1 can diced tomatoes (14.5 ounce)
  • 1 can tomato sauce (14.5 ounce)
  • 1 small can diced green chilis (optional)
  • 1 cup corn or mixed vegetables
  • 3/4 cup small, uncooked pasta, such as a shell pasta
  • 2 teaspoons cumin
  • ½ teaspoon lemon pepper
  • ½ teaspoon black pepper
  • ½ teaspoon salt, if desired

Chop roast beef into small, bite-sized cubes. Blend all the ingredients into a 4 quart stockpot and bring to a boil. If soup is too thick, add more stock until desired consistency. Reduce heat to low and simmer for about 30to 45 minutes or until meat is tender.

***

Book Cover for Rosies Riveting Recipes
Cover photo by Rob Resetar

Imagine the government telling you how much meat or chicken you could buy, or how much sugar or flour you could have. Strange as it may seem, at one time it actually happened. During WWII, the United States government devised a food rationing program to help insure that every family would have enough to eat. Rosie’s Riveting Recipes gives readers a glimpse into life on the WWII home front. A cookbook and a history lesson in one Rosies’s Riveting Recipes includes more than 180 economical, back-to-basics World War II ration recipes and short tales of life on the American home front interspersed throughout.

Rosie’s Riveting Recipes is available on Amazon and Barnesandnoble.com.

White Chicken Chili

© Can Stock Photo/
roxanabalint

I love making chili con carne. It’s one of my all time favorite comfort foods. It’s spicy, it’s tasty, and simple to make. Best of all, many of the ingredients are already in our pantries and it freezes well.

However, it’s also nice to take a break and try a different variation, such as chicken chili.

Chicken chili is a delicious alternative for those who don’t eat red meat. It has its own unique flavor, and, like chili con carne, chicken chili also freezes well. Turkey can also be substituted for chicken, making it a nice recipe for delicious holiday leftovers.

White Chicken Chili

  • 1 to 1 1/2 lbs boneless chicken breasts or chicken tenders, cubed
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 2 cloves minced garlic
  • 1 cup chicken broth
  • 1 small can chopped green chilies (4 oz)
  • 2 tbsp ground cumin
  • 1 tbsp chili powder
  • 1 1/2 tsp cayenne pepper (optional)
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp pepper
  • 2 cans cannellini beans
  • 2 tbsp corn starch
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 1 cup Monterey jack cheese
  • 1 chopped jalapeno (optional)

Place olive oil in a 4-quart stockpot and cook the chicken, onions, and garlic. Once chicken is cooked all the way through add chicken broth, green chilies, beans and seasonings. Place cornstarch in a small bowl, mix thoroughly with water. Pour into the chili and bring it to a boil. Cover, reduce heat to low, and simmer for 20 to 30 minutes. Top each serving with cheese and add chopped jalapeno, if desired. Goes nicely with cornbread on the side.

Variations: For a hotter chili, add the cayenne pepper. For a sweeter chili, substitute 1 can of corn for 1 can of cannellini beans.

***

Book Cover for Rosies Riveting Recipes
Cover photo by Rob Resetar

Imagine the government telling you how much meat or chicken you could buy, or how much sugar or flour you could have. Strange as it may seem, at one time it actually happened. During WWII, the United States government devised a food rationing program to help insure that every family would have enough to eat. Rosie’s Riveting Recipes gives readers a glimpse into life on the WWII home front. A cookbook and a history lesson in one Rosies’s Riveting Recipes includes more than 180 economical, back-to-basics World War II ration recipes and short tales of life on the American home front interspersed throughout.

Rosie’s Riveting Recipes is available on Amazon, Barnes&Noble.com and other online booksellers.

 

 

Pumpkin Walnut Cheesecake Pie

© Can Stock Photo / karenr

Okay everybody. Sing along with me. “It’s the most wonderful time of the year, tra, la, la.” Why? Because it’s Pumpkin Spice season!

This recipe may not exactly be low carb, but who cares?  It’s pumpkin spice season! So what makes pumpkin spice season so special? Well, it’s one of those things that if I have to explain to you, you’ll never understand. Suffice to say pumpkin spice is something you either love, or you can’t stand. There seems to be no middle ground.

If you’re a pumpkin spice fan like I am, you’ll have to give this recipe a try. You may even want to consider serving it with your holiday dinner instead of a traditional pumpkin pie. Did I also mention it’s sinfully delicious? But don’t take my word for it. Give it a try and taste it for yourself

Gayle Martin

PUMPKIN WALNUT CHEESECAKE PIE

  • 2 packages (8 oz) cream cheese
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 1 (15 oz) can of pumpkin
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 frozen pie shells, thawed
  • 1 1/4 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon ginger
  • 1 teaspoon nutmeg
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt

Topping

  • 6 tablespoons butter, softened
  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • 1 cup chopped walnuts

Preheat oven to 350F. Cream sugar and cheese together in a large mixing bowl. Add pumpkin and spices and mix thoroughly. Beat in eggs, one at a time. Add salt and blend until creamy. Pour equal amounts into pie shells and bake for 30 minutes.

While cheesecake is baking prepare topping. Cream butter and brown sugar in a small mixing bowl. Add walnuts and blend thoroughly. Remove cheesecakes from oven after 30 minutes and sprinkle on topping. Return to oven and bake for approximately 50 minutes to 1 hour, or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean. Let cool. Serve with whipped cream topping, if desired.

***

Book Cover for Rosies Riveting Recipes
Cover photo by Rob Resetar

Imagine the government telling you how much meat or chicken you could buy, or how much sugar or flour you could have. Strange as it may seem, at one time it actually happened. During WWII, the United States government devised a food rationing program to help insure that every family would have enough to eat. Rosie’s Riveting Recipes gives readers a glimpse into life on the WWII home front. A cookbook and a history lesson in one Rosies’s Riveting Recipes includes more than 180 economical, back-to-basics World War II ration recipes and short tales of life on the American home front interspersed throughout.

Rosie’s Riveting Recipes is available on Amazon and Barnesandnoble.com.

Southern Chicken Pie

Book Cover for Rosies Riveting Recipes
Cover photo by Rob Resetar

The other day I was looking for a chicken and dumplings recipe, and this gem, from the Rosies Riveting Recipes historic cookbook, can be easily adapted for making chicken and dumplings. It’s also an easy way to use up leftover rotisserie chicken, or holiday turkey. Best of all, it’s delicious.

SOUTHERN CHICKEN PIE

  • 11/2 cups chopped celery
  • 1/2 cup chopped green pepper
  • 1/2 cup sliced mushrooms (optional)
  • 6 tablespoons butter
  • 8 tablespoons enriched flour
  • 4 cups milk (or half chicken broth and half milk)
  • 3 cups cooked, sliced chicken

Pan-fry celery, green pepper, and mushrooms in butter until tender. Remove from butter; add flour; mix well. Add milk gradually, stirring constantly, until thickened. Add celery mixture and chicken; blend well. Season to taste. Turn into 21/2 quart casserole or baking dish. Top with the following:

Baking Powder Biscuit Crust

  • 2 cups sifted flour
  • 3 teaspoons baking powder (or 2 teaspoons double-acting)*
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 cup shortening
  • 3/4 milk

Sift flour once, measure; add baking powder and salt; sift together. Cut in shortening until mixture resembles coarse meal. Add milk all at once, mixing until all flour is dampened. Turn out on floured board; knead lightly for a few seconds to smooth out dough. Roll out to fit over casserole. Place over chicken mixture. Bake in hot oven (425 F) about 25 to 30 minutes until crust is done. Serve immediately. Serves 8 to 10.

Modern adaptation: Carrots can also be used. Dough can also be placed over chicken mixture dumpling style.

* Most modern baking powder is double-acting.

Rosie’s Riveting Recipes is available on Amazon and Barnesandnoble.com.

 

Chicken Enchilada Casserole

© Can Stock Photo / roxanabalint

My parents bought an Airstream trailer shortly after my dad retired and they joined an Airstream club. They spent many years going on caravans and attending Airstream rallies where potlucks were the order of the day. It was a wonderful time in their lives. My mother brought this recipe home from one of their Airstream rallies and served it at a family get-together. We all loved it.

Fortunately, she shared the recipe with me. Generally speaking, I’m not a big casserole fan. This recipe, however, is an exception. It’s very tasty and super easy to prepare. You simply add the layers, bake, and go. I’ve taken it to many a potluck dinner, and it’s always been a big hit.

CHICKEN ENCHILADA CASSEROLE

  • 4 to 6 chicken breasts, cooked and chopped*
  • 1 large bag of restaurant style tortilla chips
  • Diced green chilies (8 ounce can)
  • 1  cup corn
  • 1 15 oz. can of black beans
  • 2 cans cream of chicken soup
  • 1 can cream of mushroom soup
  • 1/2 cup chicken broth or water
  • 2 cups cheddar or Mexican blend cheese
  • breadcrumbs (optional)

Coat a 9 x 13 inch baking dish with cooking spray. Break the tortilla chips and cover the bottom of the pan, about 1/4 inch thick. Add chopped chicken breasts, green chilies, corn and black beans. Blend the soups and chicken broth together in a medium sized mixing bowl and pour over top. (Add more liquid if thinner sauce is desired.) Cover the top layer with cheese and add the breadcrumbs, if desired. Bake at 350F for 35 to 45 minutes or until sauce is bubbling and the cheese is melted and slightly browned.

Variations: Use jalapeno or chipotle peppers instead of green chili peppers for a spicier casserole. Turkey can be used instead of chicken.

*Two 9.75 ounce cans of chicken may be used instead of fresh chicken.

***

Book Cover for Rosies Riveting Recipes
Cover photo by Rob Resetar

Imagine the government telling you how much meat or chicken you could buy, or how much sugar or flour you could have. Strange as it may seem, at one time it actually happened. During WWII, the United States government devised a food rationing program to help insure that every family would have enough to eat. Rosie’s Riveting Recipes gives readers a glimpse into life on the WWII home front. A cookbook and a history lesson in one Rosies’s Riveting Recipes includes more than 180 economical, back-to-basics World War II ration recipes and short tales of life on the American home front interspersed throughout.

Rosie’s Riveting Recipes is available on Amazon and Barnesandnoble.com.

 

Whole Wheat Rolls

from Rosie’s Riveting Recipes
© Can Stock Photo / SeDmi

Who doesn’t love fresh, home-baked bread? Seriously. The smell of fresh bread baking is intoxicating, and when you take it out of the oven? Ooh la la! Put a little butter on it and take a bite while it’s melting. If that’s not heaven and earth then I don’t know what is.

Okay, I get it that some bread recipes are pretty cumbersome. However, this historic recipe, from Rosie’s Riveting Recipes, is actually quite easy.  The fresh baked rolls are delicious, and it would even be a fun project to do with the kids or grandkids.

Gayle Martin

WHOLE WHEAT ROLLS

  • 1 cake compressed yeast
  • 1 3/4 cups lukewarm milk
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1 tablespoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons molasses
  • 2  cups flour, sifted
  • 3 cups medium whole wheat flour
  • 4 tablespoons soft shortening

Crumble yeast into bowl. Add lukewarm milk, sugar, salt, and molasses. Work in sifted flour, whole wheat flour, and shortening. Knead until smooth. Place in greased bowl. Cover with damp cloth. Let rise until double (2 hours.) Punch down. Let rise until almost double (45 minutes.) Punch down. Let rest 15 minutes. Shape. Place in greased pan. Let rise. (30 to 40 minutes.) Bake 15 5o 20 minutes (depending on size) in hot oven (425F). Makes 2 dozen rolls.

Modern adaptation: Dark corn syrup may be used as a substitute for molasses.

 

Cover photo by Robert Resetar.

Rosie’s Riveting Recipes is available on Amazon and Barnesandnoble.com.