Classic Swiss Steak

© Can Stock Photo / roxanabalint

This is a classic recipe I learned from my mother, and it’s become one of my personal favorites. It’s easy to prepare and tasty. Best of all, it’s delicious, so enjoy.

CLASSIC SWISS STEAK

  • 2 pound round steak, 1 inch thick
  • ¼ cup all-purpose flour
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • ¼ cup beef broth or water
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • ½ bell pepper, chopped
  • 1 can diced tomatoes
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Mix flour, salt and pepper together in a bowl. Cut round steak into 5 or 6 pieces and coat both sides with the flour mixture. Pour oil into skillet, turn on heat to medium, and brown steaks until brown, approximately 7 to 10 minutes per side. Add broth, cover and reduce hit to low. Simmer for 1 hour, adding more broth or water as needed. Turn steaks over, add onions, bell pepper, and canned tomatoes. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Simmer an additional 30 minutes or until vegetables are tender.

 

Cover photo by Rob Resetar

Imagine the government telling you how much meat or chicken you could buy, or how much sugar or flour you could have. Strange as it may seem, at one time it actually happened. During WWII, the United States government devised a food rationing program to help insure that every family would have enough to eat. Rosie’s Riveting Recipes gives a glimpse into life on the WW 2 home front. A cookbook and a history lesson in one with more than 180 economical, back-to-basics World WarII ration recipes with short tales of life on the American home front interspersed throughout.

Rosie’s Riveting Recipes is available on Amazon and Barnesandnoble.com.

 

 

 

Corn Pudding

from the  pages of Rosie’s Riveting Recipes
© Can Stock Photo / zigzagmtart

This recipe is such a classic, and so simple I’m surprised neither my mother, nor any of my grandmothers, ever prepared it. It is, however, included in the Rosie’s Riveting Recipes historic cookbook, and it’s one of the easiest recipes in the entire book. The results are delicious. The pudding has a rich, buttery flavor, making it the perfect, flavorful side dish. Enjoy.

Gayle Martin

CORN PUDDING

  • 3 eggs
  • 2 cups fresh or canned corn
  • 2 tablespoons melted margarine
  • salt and pepper
  • 2 cups milk

Beat the eggs. Add all the other ingredients and salt and pepper to taste. Pour into a greased baking dish, place in a pan of hot water, and bake in a moderate oven, (350F) for about 1 hour or until set in the center. Yields 6 servings.

Note:  A 15.5 ounce can of corn works nicely for this recipe.

 

Book Cover for Rosies Riveting Recipes
Cover photo by Rob Resetar

Imagine the government telling you how much meat or chicken you could buy, or how much sugar or flour you could have. Strange as it may seem, at one time it actually happened. During WWII, the United States government devised a food rationing program to help insure that every family would have enough to eat. Rosie’s Riveting Recipes gives readers a glimpse into life on the WWII home front. A cookbook and a history lesson in one Rosies’s Riveting Recipes includes more than 180 economical, back-to-basics World War II ration recipes and short tales of life on the American home front interspersed throughout.

Rosie’s Riveting Recipes is available on Amazon and Barnesandnoble.com.

Last-Minute Tomato Soup

from the Rosie’s Riveting Recipes Cookbook

I’ve had to make a few lifestyle changes because my hypertension has become chronic. Two years of lockdowns, mask mandates and 24/7 fear mongering would elevate anyone’s blood pressure. However, my medication was no longer working, and nothing else we tried was working either. So, I decided to put myself on a low sodium diet.

It really wasn’t hard. I stopped eating fast food and processed foods, and I started reading food labels. I was shocked at the amount of salt hidden in our foods. It’s way more than our bodies need. So, I’ve gone back to eating real food made from scratch, just like in Rosie’s day. I’d forgotten how good real food actually tasted.

Today’s recipe is an easy to make alternative to canned tomato soup, and if you’re worried about salt simply use low sodium or salt free tomatoes.

By the way, my blood pressure has dropped. I’m also losing weight and I feel so much better.

Thanks, Rosie.

Gayle Martin

Last Minute Tomato Soup

  • 1 cup cooked tomatoes
  • 3 cups rich milk*
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper
  • 1 tablespoon butter, (if desired)

Stir tomatoes well to break up the pulp and juice. Add milk. Heat, stirring frequently. Add salt and pepper and butter, if desired. Serve immediately. Makes 4 servings.

Modern adaptation: Used canned, diced, Italian-style tomatoes to create a flavorful, elegant soup.

* 1940’s term for condensed milk

Book Cover for Rosies Riveting Recipes
Cover photo by Rob Resetar

Imagine the government telling you how much meat or chicken you could buy, or how much sugar or flour you could have. Strange as it may seem, at one time it actually happened. During WWII, the United States government devised a food rationing program to help insure that every family would have enough to eat. Rosie’s Riveting Recipes gives readers a glimpse into life on the WWII home front. A cookbook and a history lesson in one Rosies’s Riveting Recipes includes more than 180 economical, back-to-basics World War II ration recipes and short tales of life on the American home front interspersed throughout.

Rosie’s Riveting Recipes is available on Amazon and Barnesandnoble.com.

 

Southwestern Roast Beef Soup

© Can Stock Photo/
roxanabalint

Once upon a time, in a galaxy far, far away, I rented a booth in an antique mall in Tucson, Arizona.

The mall included a small soup and sandwich shop. Nothing big and fancy, but it was a cozy, quiet place to grab a quick lunch whenever I was there. The food was always top notch.

One day they were serving a southwestern roast beef soup. It tasted like a cross between a beef stew and chili con carne. I wanted to ask for the recipe. However, their soups were usually made from the prior day’s leftovers, so I doubt there was a recipe. So, I did the next best thing. I let my palate decide, and then I came up with my own recipe. It’s a close match, and since it uses leftover roast beef, I’m sure Rosie would have approved.

Sadly, the antique mall is no more. While I made a profit each year, it wasn’t much, and maintaining my booth  was a costly undertaking. I eventually closed it out. The mall itself went out of business a few years later, which I was sorry to see. That said, I have no regrets. I met a lot of interesting people while I was there, and I learned a lot about how the retail business works.

Gayle Martin

Southwestern Roast Beef Soup

½ to 1 pound leftover roast beef (such as round roast), including the pan drippings

  • 1 cup beef stock
  • 1 can diced tomatoes (14.5 ounce)
  • 1 can tomato sauce (14.5 ounce)
  • 1 small can diced green chilis (optional)
  • 1 cup corn or mixed vegetables
  • 3/4 cup small, uncooked pasta, such as a shell pasta
  • 2 teaspoons cumin
  • ½ teaspoon lemon pepper
  • ½ teaspoon black pepper
  • ½ teaspoon salt, if desired

Chop roast beef into small, bite-sized cubes. Blend all the ingredients into a 4 quart stockpot and bring to a boil. If soup is too thick, add more stock until desired consistency. Reduce heat to low and simmer for about 30to 45 minutes or until meat is tender.

***

Book Cover for Rosies Riveting Recipes
Cover photo by Rob Resetar

Imagine the government telling you how much meat or chicken you could buy, or how much sugar or flour you could have. Strange as it may seem, at one time it actually happened. During WWII, the United States government devised a food rationing program to help insure that every family would have enough to eat. Rosie’s Riveting Recipes gives readers a glimpse into life on the WWII home front. A cookbook and a history lesson in one Rosies’s Riveting Recipes includes more than 180 economical, back-to-basics World War II ration recipes and short tales of life on the American home front interspersed throughout.

Rosie’s Riveting Recipes is available on Amazon and Barnesandnoble.com.

White Chicken Chili

© Can Stock Photo/
roxanabalint

I love making chili con carne. It’s one of my all time favorite comfort foods. It’s spicy, it’s tasty, and simple to make. Best of all, many of the ingredients are already in our pantries and it freezes well.

However, it’s also nice to take a break and try a different variation, such as chicken chili.

Chicken chili is a delicious alternative for those who don’t eat red meat. It has its own unique flavor, and, like chili con carne, chicken chili also freezes well. Turkey can also be substituted for chicken, making it a nice recipe for delicious holiday leftovers.

White Chicken Chili

  • 1 to 1 1/2 lbs boneless chicken breasts or chicken tenders, cubed
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 2 cloves minced garlic
  • 1 cup chicken broth
  • 1 small can chopped green chilies (4 oz)
  • 2 tbsp ground cumin
  • 1 tbsp chili powder
  • 1 1/2 tsp cayenne pepper (optional)
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp pepper
  • 2 cans cannellini beans
  • 2 tbsp corn starch
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 1 cup Monterey jack cheese
  • 1 chopped jalapeno (optional)

Place olive oil in a 4-quart stockpot and cook the chicken, onions, and garlic. Once chicken is cooked all the way through add chicken broth, green chilies, beans and seasonings. Place cornstarch in a small bowl, mix thoroughly with water. Pour into the chili and bring it to a boil. Cover, reduce heat to low, and simmer for 20 to 30 minutes. Top each serving with cheese and add chopped jalapeno, if desired. Goes nicely with cornbread on the side.

Variations: For a hotter chili, add the cayenne pepper. For a sweeter chili, substitute 1 can of corn for 1 can of cannellini beans.

***

Book Cover for Rosies Riveting Recipes
Cover photo by Rob Resetar

Imagine the government telling you how much meat or chicken you could buy, or how much sugar or flour you could have. Strange as it may seem, at one time it actually happened. During WWII, the United States government devised a food rationing program to help insure that every family would have enough to eat. Rosie’s Riveting Recipes gives readers a glimpse into life on the WWII home front. A cookbook and a history lesson in one Rosies’s Riveting Recipes includes more than 180 economical, back-to-basics World War II ration recipes and short tales of life on the American home front interspersed throughout.

Rosie’s Riveting Recipes is available on Amazon, Barnes&Noble.com and other online booksellers.

 

 

Classic Recipes vs Modern Cuisine

A bowl of chicken and dumplines
© Can Stock Photo / MSPhotographics

I’ve always subscribed to the notion that what separates a good cook from a not so good cook is their willingness to tweak recipes to put their own stamp on them. However, I sometimes get annoyed with celebrity chefs on television. I’ve watched them belittle the old classics, saying they’re too “old fashioned.” Or they’ll make a crass remark about it being the 21st century and not 1950s. Really? What a bunch of conceited, arrogant jerks!

What makes these recipes classic? The answer is simple. They taste great. That’s why they’ve been around for such a long time.

I’ll always remember my grandmother’s cooking. As far as my siblings and I were concerned, no one on the planet could cook better than Grandma. I also remember my sister-in-law bragging about writing down all of Grandma’s recipes. Those recipes are family heirlooms. Nothing makes us feel like Grandma is still with us more than enjoying her tapioca pudding or her chicken and dumplings. 

I feel the same when I prepare my dad’s famous pinto beans. My father could hold his own in the kitchen. In fact, he could open the refrigerator, grab leftovers, and create an amazing dish without a recipe.

A family recipe collection can be a priceless legacy which can be easily copied and shared. You never need to worry about fighting with your siblings over who gets the recipe box. You won’t have to pay any estate tax on it either. That is, until the government figures out a way to do it.

So, here’s to my grandmother’s recipes, and our passing them down to our own grandchildren.

Gayle Martin