Broccoli with Hollandaise Sauce

© Can Stock Photo/
bhofack2

If you ever want to spruce up a side dish to impress your family and friends, this one will do nicely. The recipe is included in the Rosie’s Riveting Recipes historic cookbook. Hollandaise sauce is quick and easy to make, and the ingredients are already in the fridge. Homemade also tastes better than a mix.

Everything is better with hollandaise sauce. Along with broccoli, it tastes great on asparagus, baked potatoes and my all time favorite breakfast. Eggs Benedict.

Gayle Martin

BROCCOLI WITH HOLLANDAISE SAUCE

  • 1/2 cup margarine
  • 4 egg yolks
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • salt, pepper
  • cooked broccoli

Put all ingredients, except broccoli, in the top of a double boiler or a small deep saucepan. Put over direct heat, and beat constantly with a dover beater* until the sauce is thick, smooth and foamy.

Serve on hot cooked broccoli, or other cooked green vegetables.

* A dover beater is another term for an egg beater

 

Cover photo by Robert Resetar.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rosie’s Riveting Recipes is available on Amazon and Barnesandnoble.com.

 

Barbecued Ribs Crockpot Style

© Can Stock Photo/
robynmac

My college boyfriend, who I’ll call George, was studying to become an architect. However, had he pursued it, I truly believe he would have been a damn fine chef. George was a whiz in the kitchen. He was master at creating simple, tasty dishes on a slim budget. George could take a boring, frozen pizza, pile on his own freshly made toppings, and turn it into a gourmet meal.

One of George’s signature dishes was his short ribs. He’d dump them in a crock pot, pour in a bottle of barbecue sauce, and cook them on low for eight hours. They came out so tender the meat fell off the bone. Neither of us had access to an outdoor grill at the time, but George’s ribs sure satisfied our yen for barbecue.

Over the years I’ve tweaked his recipe, ever so slightly. These days, with food prices on the rise, short ribs are like gold. However, their ugly cousin, the back rib, is cheaper and flavorful. They also work nicely in a crock pot.

I simply stack the ribs in and add a little barbecue sauce between the layers. I’ll then add a little sauce on the top. The sauce becomes watery as it cooks, so I only use a quarter to half a bottle. Then I turn the pot on low and cook for seven to eight hours. I also check them while they’re cooking. If the meat on top gets a little dry I simply spoon some of the sauce from the bottom of the pot over it. Then, once the ribs are cooked, I’ll pour on a little more fresh sauce when I plate them.

I like to serve mine with scalloped potatoes or baked beans. Or both. Some people like corn on the cob and mashed potatoes. Or you may wish to try grandmother’s green bean recipe. Whichever way you choose, it’s a nice recipe for those who don’t have access to an outdoor grill.

Gayle Martin

Cover photo by Rob Resetar

If you like ribs and barbeque then be sure to check out the Rosie’s Riveting Recipes cookbook for delicious historic barbeque style recipes.

 

Chicken Scaloppine in Wine Sauce

© Can Stock Photo/
roxanabalint

My favorite supermarket carries fresh, thinly sliced chicken breasts which always seem to be on sale. I’ve come up with several different ways to prepare them, however, this recipe is my favorite. It was originally a veal recipe, but I played with it and came up with something new and delicious.

While this recipe is not included in the Rosie’s Riveting Recipes historic cookbook, I think Rosie would have approved. It’s easy to prepare, and most of the ingredients can be found in our pantries. It’s also delicious.

Gayle Martin

 

CHICKEN SCALOPPINE IN WHITE WINE SAUCE

  • 4 to 6 thinly sliced chicken breasts
  • 3 to 4 tablespoons flour
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 2 to 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 4 to 6 tablespoons white wine vinegar (approximately)
  • 1/4 cup white cooking wine
  • 1 cup chicken broth
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt (optional)
  • 3 cups cooked rice, wild rice, or noodles

Wash chicken breasts thoroughly. Pat dry with a paper towel. Melt butter in a skillet and add olive oil. While the oil is heating roll the chicken breasts in flour until lightly coated. Place in hot oil and cook each side until it’s a light, golden brown color. Pour approximately 1 tablespoon white wine vinegar over each chicken breast and add the chicken broth, white cooking wine and salt, if desired. Heat until sauce mixture begins to boil. Reduce heat to low, cover and simmer for 20 minutes. Serve over rice or noodles.

Variation:  Veal may be instead of chicken, and balsamic vinegar  may be used instead of white wine vinegar.

Book Cover for Rosies Riveting Recipes
Cover photo by Rob Resetar

Rosie’s Riveting Recipes is available on Amazon and Barnesandnoble.com.

Traditional Cranberry Sauce

© Can Stock Photo / margo555

I hear the least popular Thanksgiving side dish is the dreaded cranberry sauce. Okay, I have to admit it; that jelly looking cranberry colored blob that comes out of the can, shaped like the can, is nasty. So who wants to eat that? Yuck.

There is, however, a tasty alternative; making your cranberry sauce from scratch. It’s what Rosie, of the Rosie’s Riveting Recipes historic cookbook would have done. Fresh cranberry sauce surprisingly easy to prepare, and it’s delicious. You can make your cranberry sauce a day or two ahead of time. Best of all, it freezes well, so you can serve the leftover sauce at Christmas.

Believe me, once you’ve tried fresh, you will never go back to canned.

Gayle Martin

TRADITIONAL CRANBERRY SAUCE

  • 3 cups fresh cranberries
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 cup water

Place cranberries in a colander or strainer and wash thoroughly, removing any damaged berries. Set aside.

Pour water into a 2 quart saucepan and place over medium high heat. Add sugar and stir until dissolved. Bring to a boil and add cranberries. Reduce heat to medium, stirring occasionally until cranberry skins begin to pop. Keep stirring for several minutes. If a smoother sauce is desired, keep stirring until most of the skins have popped. Remove from heat and set aside. Sauce will thicken as it cools. Refrigerate sauce once it reaches room temperature.

 

Cover photo by Robert Resetar.

Rosie’s Riveting Recipes contains a variety of delicious recipes for the dishes our grandmothers used to make. It’s available on Amazon and Barnesandnoble.com.